Kirsten Martin

Mendoza College of Business

Office
364 Mendoza College Of Business
Notre Dame, IN 46556
Phone
574-631-6072
Email
kmarti33@nd.edu
Website

William P. and Hazel B. White Center Professor of Technology Ethics

  • Technology and Ethics
  • Privacy
  • Business Ethics
  • AI Accountability

Martin’s Latest News

Martin in the News

Deal or no deal, Elon Musk could upend Twitter’s business for a long time

“The places which are just cesspools of no content moderation have not taken off,” said Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame. Thus, there could be conflict between Musk’s stated goal to grow Twitter’s business and his plans for how to handle content moderation.

If Elon Musk restores Trump’s Twitter account, it could pave the way for other platforms to do the same

Although far from perfect, Twitter has, at least historically, been viewed as “more nuanced in their content moderation” and as “trying to do the right thing more often than other platforms,” said Kristin Martin, professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame. 

Reversing Trump Twitter ban will provoke user backlash, Elon Musk warned

Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame in Chicago, said Musk would face a backlash if he reinstated Trump’s account. “If Musk is concerned that many people were upset that Trump was banned, he should see how many more people would be upset if Trump was not banned,” she said. “Musk only appears to be worried about the opinion of a small group of individuals who incite violence or perpetuate hate speech.”

Running Twitter may be much harder than Elon Musk thinks

“If Musk is concerned that many people were upset that Trump was banned, he should see how many more people would be upset if Trump was not banned,” said Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame.

Musk says he would reverse Twitter’s ban of Donald Trump

“If Musk is concerned that many people were upset that Trump was banned, he should see how many more people would be upset if Trump was not banned,” said Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame. “Musk only appears to be worried about the opinion of a small group of individuals who incite violence or perpetuate hate speech.”

What Would "Free Speech" on Twitter Under Elon Musk's Management Look Like?

Nima welcomes Dr. Kirsten Martin, professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame.

VOTE: Do you think Elon Musk buying Twitter will make it better?

"This move just shows how effective (moderation features) have been to annoy those in power," said Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame, to The Associated Press. "I would be worried as to how this would change Twitter's values."

Elon Musk’s promise to deliver ‘free speech’ on Twitter may have unintended consequences, say observers

“When you moderate content, it doesn’t mean that there’s less speech,” University of Notre Dame technology ethics professor Kirsten Martin said in an interview. “There can be more speech.”

Musk’s ‘free speech’ push for Twitter: Repeating history?

Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame, said Twitter has consistently worked at being a “responsible” social media company through its moderation system, its hires in the area of machine learning ethics and in whom they allow to do research on the platform.

Twitter has been focused on ‘healthy conversations.’ Elon Musk could change that

Twitter has certainly not been perfect on content moderation issues, but as Kirsten Martin, professor of technology ethics at Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, put it: “Twitter has consistently strived to be a responsible social media company through not only their content moderation but also their hires in the area of machine learning ethics.”

Can Musk deliver on his vision for Twitter? Questions remain

“This move just shows how effective (moderation features) have been to annoy those in power,” said Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame. “I would be worried as to how this would change Twitter’s values.”

Prayer apps are popular, but users cautioned to review privacy policies

Kirsten Martin, director of the Notre Dame Technology Ethics Center at the University of Notre Dame, expressed concern for apps based on “this idea of selling a point of vulnerability to others that don’t have our interest in mind.”

TikTok Becomes An Unlikely Source Of Information Amid Tensions With Ukraine

Technology Professor Kirsten Martin from the University of Notre Dame stated that TikTok’s data collection and practices were fairly standard compared to other social media applications.

Last year, advertisers boycotted Facebook over hate speech. Today, they’re silent

“It’s perhaps not something that people can galvanize around very easily and could be why they don’t see it as something that they need to take a stand on now,” said Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame.

Facebook to shut down face-recognition system, delete data

The decision “is a good example of trying to make product decisions that are good for the user and the company,” said Kristen Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame. 

Facebook ditches facial recognition feature, to delete data

Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at Notre Dame, told CNN the move was "a good example of regulatory pressure."

Facebook is shutting down its controversial facial recognition system over 'societal concerns'

Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame, said the trove of biometric data represents a vulnerability for Meta that will now be muted. 

Facebook is shutting down its facial recognition software

Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame, called the decision "a good example of regulatory pressure", as the company's facial-recognition system had long been targeted by regulators. 

Facebook Announces New Name: Meta

“Facebook executives have not proven to be trustworthy with their products in the real world, so it's not clear why we should trust them in a virtual world," Kirsten Martin, professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, said in a statement.

Facebook changes name to Meta: Mark Zuckerberg announces company rebrand as it moves to the metaverse

Kirsten Martin, director of the University of Notre Dame's Tech Ethics Center, questioned whether Facebook should be trusted with the metaverse.

Facebook becomes Meta in rebranding seen as ‘an attempt at distraction’

“It’s dystopian, the worst of all names. If we don’t trust them in the real world, why would we in the virtual world?” Kirsten Martin, professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, told MarketWatch.

Notre Dame professor addresses Facebook's failures

Professor Kristen Martin, who teaches technology and ethics at Notre Dame, discusses different ways Facebook can prevent the spread of misinformation and create a safer online environment for their users.

AI in Admissions Can Reduce or Reinforce Biases

“When you’re using AI, you’re usually asking the data to find out what you have said is important based on the data that is in your possession,” said Dr. Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology and ethics at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza School of Business. 

Emerging technologies pose ethical quandaries. Where does IT leadership fit in?

Aligning business values with vendor relationships is a "long-standing issue that companies have to grapple with when they decide who they're going to do business with," according to Kirsten Martin, professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame's William P. and Hazel B. White Center. 

Meet the company that’s tracking your location to study Covid-19

Public health and national security issues are some of the most valuable applications of aggregated location data, says Kirsten Martin, a professor of technology ethics at the University of Notre Dame.