Clive Neal

Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences

Phone
574-631-8328
Email
neal.1@nd.edu
Website
Blog

Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences

  • Lunar petrology (rocks)
  • Geochemistry
  • Planetary geology
  • The moon

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Neal’s Latest News

Neal in the News

Notre Dame joins Universities Space Research Association

The University of Notre Dame has been inducted into the Universities Space Research Association, a consortium of 121 universities that works to advance space-related education and research.

China set to launch high-stakes mission to moon's 'hidden' side

"International cooperation is key (to lunar exploration)," Clive Neal, professor of planetary geology at the University of Notre Dame, told Reuters. "It's just that China and the U.S. aren't cooperating right now. I hope that will happen."

Japan’s successful Moon landing was the most precise ever

“In Apollo 16 samples, we found exotic basalts which were most likely ejected from Mare Nectaris,” says Clive Neal, a planetary geologist at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana.

NASA opens door to cooperation with China on Moon rock research

The NASA move “is huge,” says Clive Neal, a lunar scientist at the University of Notre Dame. 

Space

China's Chang'e 5 moon samples, beyond NASA's reach for years, are finally available to US scientists

"This is excellent news as it allows U.S.-based scientists to bring their expertise to investigating these unique lunar samples," said Clive Neal, a leading expert on the moon at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana. 

Paper and bamboo straws contain PFAS chemicals more often than plastic straws do, study finds

Graham Peaslee, who studies PFAS at the University of Notre Dame and was not involved in the new research, said it's possible manufacturers aren't testing for the chemicals in their own products.

Boston Herald

India moon landing near south pole is ‘fantastic achievement’: A possible spot for moon bases

“It’s a fantastic achievement for India,” University of Notre Dame Professor Clive Neal told the Herald. “It’s an exciting accomplishment not only for them but for the international community."

Chandrayaan-3, Luna-25: The race to unravel the mysteries of Moon's south pole

"It is yet to be proven that the water ice is accessible or mineable. In other words, are there reserves of water that can be extracted economically?" Clive Neal, a professor of planetary geology at the US University of Notre Dame, told me.

The moon beckons once again, and this time NASA wants to stay

“The time is now right to take a giant leap by using the moon to learn how to live off the land, thus enabling sustained human presence on Earth while stimulating a new sector of our economy,” Clive Neal, a professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Notre Dame, told the National Space Council in 2019. 

Space.com

Surviving the lunar night can be a challenge for astronauts on the moon

Looking back on the 20th century Apollo era, there are lessons to be re-learned, said Clive Neal, a lunar exploration expert in the department of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana. 

China’s Discovery of Lunar Mineral Could Add to Fuller View of the Moon

New minerals discovered on the moon are not abundant, said Clive Neal, a professor of planetary geology at the University of Notre Dame. 

NASA is set to return to the moon. Here are 4 reasons to go back

Artemis could change that, says Clive Neal, a professor of civil and environmental engineering and Earth sciences at the University of Notre Dame. 

How NASA’s Artemis program plans to return astronauts to the moon

For University of Notre Dame lunar scientist Clive Neal, whether Artemis can be considered a success or not depends on the technological benefits that it yields. 

China’s first Moon rocks ignite research bonanza

“There are a lot of young Chinese researchers getting involved,” says Clive Neal, a geoscientist at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, who has worked on Chang’e-5 samples with collaborators in China. 

Vanity Fair

The “Real” Conspiracy Theories Behind Roland Emmerich’s Moonfall

Clive R. Neal, professor of civil engineering and geological sciences at the University of Notre Dame, describes it this way on NASA’s website: “The moon was ringing like a bell.”

China’s New Moon Rocks Hint at a Violent, Wet History

But Clive Neal, a planetary geologist at the University of Notre Dame, told The Daily Beast it’s all about properly interpreting the new findings.

Space News

NASA looking for earlier launch of lunar orbiter smallsat mission

Clive Neal, a committee member from the University of Notre Dame, asked if it would be possible to launch Lunar Trailblazer as a co-manifested payload on one of the series of Commercial Lunar Payload Service (CLPS) missions that will be launching to the moon starting late this year.

Space.com

China's Yutu 2 rover finds 'milestone' on far side of the moon

Clive Neal, a leading lunar expert at the University of Notre Dame, agrees that, based on the images, the specimens are impact ejecta rather than exposed bedrocks.

Will increasing traffic to the Moon contaminate its precious ice?

“Right now, we’ve got some scientists saying we can’t go anywhere near it because we’re going to ruin it,” says Clive Neal, a geoscientist at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana. 

China Brings Moon Rocks to Earth, and a New Era of Competition to Space

“They represent a completely different era of lunar history and will definitely help in our quest to understand the evolution of our moon,” wrote Clive R. Neal, a professor of civil engineering and geological sciences at the University of Notre Dame who said he would love a chance to examine the new samples.

NASA is paying startups for moon rocks. It's not what you think

"It's important that we balance, moving forward together in a way that will enable this [lunar] economy as well as the science," said Clive Neal, an engineering professor at the University of Notre Dame.

Chang’e-5: why has China sent a probe to the moon?

Clive Neal, a geoscientist at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, told Nature the lander could crash, topple over, or the samples could fall out as it moves. 

China Moon mission and a scholar on death row

If the mission achieves its goals, it will mark the beginning of a new era of robotic sample returns from the Moon, which will undoubtedly change scientists’ understanding of the planetary body, says Clive Neal, a geoscientist at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana.

China just landed its Chang'e-5 spacecraft on the moon. The mission could bring moon rocks to Earth for the first time in 40-plus years.

"The moon is small, so its heat engine should have run out a long time ago," Clive Neal, a geoscientist at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, told Nature.

China just launched a mission to the moon to collect rock samples — the first time a country will have done so in more than 40 years

"The moon is small, so its heat engine should have run out a long time ago," Clive Neal, a geoscientist at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, told Nature.

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