John Costello

Assistant Professor, Marketing

Marketing

Office
381 Mendoza College Of Business
Notre Dame, IN 46556
Phone
+1 574-631-5171
Email
jcostel4@nd.edu

Assistant Professor, Marketing

  • Consumer behavior

  • Branding

  • Messaging

     

Costello’s Latest News

Costello in the News

The Food Tech

Tendencia de mensajes alcistas atraen a consumidores

Así lo dieron a conocer investigadores con sede en Estados Unidos, en específico el autor del artículo John Costello, profesor asistente de marketing en la Universidad de Notre Dame, de dicho país.

Nutrition Insight

Optimism prevails: Uptrend messaging promotes healthier consumer behavior, study finds

“We find that uptrend messaging can be used to encourage healthy behaviors that improve consumer quality of life,” lead author John Costello, assistant professor of marketing at the University of Notre Dame, US, tells NutritionInsight. 

Management Today

Better to be cool than 'kool'

In a new study, Walker and John Costello, assistant professor of marketing at the University of Notre Dame, found that consumers deemed these tactics to be marketing gimmicks, and the brands insincere. 

Should Companies Use Unconventional Spellings for Products? It Isn’t Always Klear

“Companies and marketing firms spend a lot of time and money trying to come up with names, but they aren’t always aware that unconventional spellings may negatively impact customers’ initial perceptions of the brand or company,” says John Costello, an assistant professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business and one of the paper’s co-authors. 

MediaPost (subscription)

Misspelled Brand Names: Pro Or Con?

John Costello, assistant professor of marketing at Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business, isn't too sure.

ZME Science

“Lift” not “Lyft” — alternative spellings perceived as insincere and disliked by consumers

The study was carried out by John Costello, assistant professor of marketing at Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, along with Jesse Walker and Rebecca Walker Reczek from Ohio State University.

What do Lyft and Krispy Kreme have in common? This—and consumers hate it

“Consumers perceive unconventionally spelled names as a persuasion tactic or a marketing gimmick, leading them to view the brand as less sincere,” lead researcher John Costello told Notre Dame News.

Cosmos Magazine

Misspelld, misconceivd. Uniquely spelld brand names don’t sell

“We discreetly observed and recorded participants’ seltzer sampling choices to measure the impact of an unconventionally spelled brand name on real product choice,” says lead author John Costello, assistant professor of marketing at Notre Dame.