David Cortright

Keough School of Global Affairs

Office
O111 Hesburgh Center For International Studies
Notre Dame, IN 46556
Phone
574-631-8536
Email
dcortrig@nd.edu
Website
Blog

Director of the Global Policy Initiative; Special Advisor for Policy Studies; Professor Emeritus of the Practice

  • Nonviolent social change
  • Nuclear disarmament
  • The use of multilateral sanctions and incentives as tools of international peacemaking
  • Nonviolent social change

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Cortright in the News

The Purpose of Sanctions

David Cortright is Professor Emeritus at the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.

Are sanctions actually nonviolent?

David Cortright, a scholar at the University of Notre Dame and the co-author of The Sanctions Decade: Assessing UN Strategies in the 1990s, told Sojourners that these sanctions are “probably the most severe sanctions that have ever been imposed” on Russia “in terms of the sweep of the restrictions and the amount of money that’s locked down.”

For isolated Russia, replacing key imports an uphill battle

Across sectors, things will get worse as more and more foreign companies flee Russia, said David Cortright, director of the Global Policy Initiative at the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.

The aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk crossed to the Atlantic after a brief call at Punta Arenas

“The fighting spread rapidly throughout the ship, with bands of Blacks and Whites marauding through the decks and attacking each other with fists, chains, wrenches, and pipes,” according to David Cortright, now with the Kroc Institute at the University of Notre Dame.

Seizing Russian superyachts is easier said than done

“I’ve been studying sanctions for some decades and we see frequently that the assets of the troublemakers are frozen. They’re locked down, they can’t use them, they can’t get access to dollars or to credit or hard currencies, but the idea of actually seizing assets, this is pretty unprecedented,” said David Cortright, director of the Global Policy Initiative at the University of Notre Dame.

Global powers need to take a crucial step before sanctions will work

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Sanctions stand a better chance of working if they're enforced by multiple countries. (Video featuring David Cortright, Director of the Global Policy Initiative, University of Notre Dame.)

US-EU sanctions will pummel the Russian economy – two experts explain why they are likely to stick and sting

David Cortright is affiliated with Win Without War. George A. Lopez is a Non-Resident Fellow with the Quincy Institute, Washington, D.C., and a U.S. Fulbright Senior Specialist in Conflict Resolution and Peace Studies, 2018-2023.

Russia-Ukraine crisis: Can US sanctions sway Putin’s thinking?

They’ve targeted oligarchs and organisations close to Russian President Vladimir Putin. But they have so far failed to deter Putin from “continuing to stir up trouble over Ukraine,” said David Cortright, director of the Global Policy Initiative at the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute.

The U.S. warns Russia it faces sanctions if it invades Ukraine. Do sanctions work?

NPR's Rachel Martin discusses the potential effectiveness of new U.S. sanctions on Russia with David Cortright, director of the Global Policy Initiative at Notre Dame's Keough School of Global Affairs.

Why Biden’s threat to sanction Russia probably won’t deter Putin in Ukraine

Written by David Cortright, Keough School of Global Affairs.

US retreat from Iraq: Will France and Europe etc fill in the vacuum?

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David Cortright discusses the future of Iraq.

To end war in Afghanistan, Taliban demand Afghan president’s removal

Madhav Joshi is associate director of the PAM project, which has the mandate to monitor the 2016 Colombian Final Agreement and is partly funded by the US State Department, the European Union, the Humanity United, and the UN's Multi-Partner Trust Fund. David Cortright has raised funds from the US State Department for the Kroc Institute project monitoring the Colombia peace agreement. He is active with the NGO Win Without War, which conducts policy advocacy on progressive foreign policy issues.

Experts: U.S. pullout plan in Afghanistan does not address civilians' needs

"The U.S. policy has had diminishing returns and has not been able to achieve any significant goal over the last decade or more. The goal was to create a more secure, stable Afghanistan and that certainly has not happened," said David Cortright, director of the Global Policy Initiative at the University of Notre Dame's Keough School of Global Affairs.