Research fellows tackle drug resistance, disease transmission and other global health issues

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2019 EIGH Fellows

2019 EIGH Fellows

Nine graduate students from the University of Notre Dame have joined the Eck Institute for Global Health’s fellowship program. The program aims to support students across the University with an interest in topics that impact global health.

“Along with providing financial support for impactful global health research, the Eck Institute for Global Health fellowship program provides an opportunity for students to connect with peer researchers across campus and learn from one another,” said Bernard Nahlen, director of the Eck Institute and professor of biological sciences. “By championing a diverse array of research programs from biology to anthropology, we aim to encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration that benefits the next generation of global health leaders.”

The 2019 EIGH graduate student fellows are:

Katelyn Carothers, graduate student of biological sciences, for her project titled “Role for a secreted Streptococcal protease in host cell and polymicrobial interactions.” Carothers received her bachelor’s degree from Manchester University, and her adviser is Shaun Lee, associate professor of biological sciences.

Rose Donohue, graduate student of biological sciences, for the study “Understanding neglected tropical disease control from a socio-ecological perspective.” Donohue received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Notre Dame, and her adviser is Edwin Michael, professor of biological sciences.

Daniel Hammers, graduate student of biological sciences, for his project, “Identification of a host cell membrane target for Streptolysin S.” Hammers received his bachelor’s degree from Houghton College and his adviser is also Lee.

Kayla Hurd, graduate student of anthropology, for her study titled “Are insects the next health aid? Exploring the correlation between seasonality and consumption patterns with blood spots in Oaxaca, Mexico.” She recently published a paper on the topic in Annals of the Entomological Society of America, which was funded by the United States Department of Agriculture. Hurd received her bachelor’s degree from Grand Valley State University and her master’s degree from Wayne State University, and her adviser is Vania Smith-Oka, associate professor of anthropology and director of graduate studies in anthropology.

Chinedu Madukoma, graduate student of civil and environmental engineering and earth sciences, for his project titled “Examining the role of type IV pili in surface motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.” Madukoma received his bachelor’s degree from Babcock University, and his adviser is Joshua Shrout, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering and earth sciences.

Rachel Oidtman, graduate student of biological sciences, for her study,“Inferring and forecasting pathogen transmission dynamics by confronting models with epidemiological time series.” Oidtman received her bachelor’s degree from Cornell University, and her adviser is Alex Perkins, the Eck Family Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences.

Kevin G. Sanchez, graduate student of biological sciences, for his project, “The mechanisms of ESX-1 feedback regulation in Mycobacterium marinum.” Sanchez received his bachelor’s degree from Marquette University, and his adviser is Patricia Champion, associate professor of biological sciences.

Morgan Smith, graduate student of biological sciences, for her study titled “Data-driven computational modeling of macroparasitic disease transmission and elimination.” Smith received her bachelor’s degree from Villanova University, and her adviser is Michael as well.

Katelyn Vendrely, graduate student of biological sciences, for her project titled “Mapping competitive growth of malaria parasites to assess the fitness impact of artemisinin resistance.” She received her bachelor’s degree from Goshen College, and her adviser is Michael Ferdig, professor of biological sciences.

To learn more about the EIGH Graduate Student Fellowship program, visit https://globalhealth.nd.edu/education-training/phd/.

The Eck Institute for Global Health at the University of Notre Dame endeavors to promote research, training and service for the advancement health standards for all people. The institute recognizes health as a fundamental human right and aims to support those in developing countries who are disproportionately impacted by preventable diseases. To learn more about the institute, visit globalhealth.nd.edu.

Contact: Kelly Thomson, institute coordinator, Eck Institute of Global Health, kthomson@nd.edu, 574-631-2171; @ndeckinstitute

Originally published by Brandi Wampler at globalhealth.nd.edu on Sept. 25.