ND vs. USC: United in tackling research challenges

Author: Jessica Sieff

A green Notre Dame pennant flies over the north end of Notre Dame Stadium the week before the football game against USC. (Photo by Matt Cashore/University of Notre Dame)
A green Notre Dame pennant flies over the north end of Notre Dame Stadium the week before the football game against USC. (Photo by Matt Cashore/University of Notre Dame)

The University of Notre Dame’s Fighting Irish football team will end its regular season with a battle against the University of Southern California Trojans — a legendary rivalry going back to 1926. With two teams that don’t back down from a fight, the matchup will undoubtedly bring the season to a thrilling conclusion.

On and off the field, there’s no denying these two programs’ power, dedication and determination. 

Notre Dame and USC share an unending passion for tackling global challenges across disciplines, advancing research on misinformation, cyberinfrastructure, early-stage disease diagnosis and business.

Solving real-world cyberinfrastructure challenges
Through CI Compass, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Cyberinfrastructure Center of Excellence dedicated to navigating the Major Facilities’ data lifecycle, researchers provide expertise and active support to cyberinfrastructure practitioners at NSF Major Facilities to ensure the integrity and effectiveness of the cyberinfrastructure upon which research and discovery depend.

Fighting the spread of misinformation
Experts at Notre Dame and at USC’s Information Sciences Institute are working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to understand and predict the spread of false or misleading information.

Advancing early-disease diagnosis
Notre Dame and USC researchers have developed a viable screening tool that significantly improves the inefficiencies of conventional methods to cut the test time for disease biomarkers. The new timeline — 30 minutes instead of 13 hours — uses smaller sample sizes to offer a new liquid biopsy option.

Focus vs. opportunity
In their study, “Keep your eye on the ball or the field? Exploring the performance implications of executive strategic attention,” Notre Dame’s Mike Mannor and USC’s John C. Eklund examine the tension between a prevailing emphasis on focus and the typical CEO’s tendency toward ambition.