Notre Dame News https://news.nd.edu/ Notre Dame News gathers and disseminates information that enhances understanding of the University’s academic and research mission and its accomplishments as a Catholic institute of higher learning. en-us 2018-01-23T03:37:46+0000 Snite Museum director Loving to retire https://news.nd.edu/news/snite-museum-director-loving-to-retire/ news_83249 2018-01-22T08:00:00-0500 Dennis Brown Charles R. Loving, director of the Snite Museum of Art at the University of Notre Dame for the past 18 years, will retire, effective June 30.

Snite Museum director Loving to retire

Dennis Brown

Charles R. Loving, director of the Snite Museum of Art at the University of Notre Dame for the past 18 years, will retire, effective June 30.

“The Snite has flourished under Chuck’s direction, with both expanded and new collections and ever-increasing outreach to the local community and schools,” said Maura Ryan, vice president and associate provost. “His wise and visionary leadership will be missed.

We will immediately initiate a national search to identify a museum director with the vision and experience needed to shape a new home for the arts and, more importantly, to further the vision for the arts at the heart of Notre Dame.”

In addition to his overall direction of the Snite Museum, Loving has served as curator of the University’s Charles B. Hayes Family Sculpture Park and George Rickey Sculpture Archive. He also served six years as the Snite’s associate director and was associate director of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts. He has been widely published, including a 2012 book on the renowned American sculptor Richard Hunt.

Loving earned his bachelor’s degree in fine arts from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and two master’s degrees from the University of Utah in art history and in arts administration. He was a 2011 recipient of Utah’s Distinguished Alumni Award in the College of Fine Arts.

“I have enjoyed a rich and rewarding career at Notre Dame, where I have had the privilege of witnessing art transform individual lives,” Loving said.

Under Loving’s guidance, the Snite now includes more than 29,000 works, including significant collections in Mesoamerican art, Old Master paintings and drawings, 19th-century French art, 19th-century photography, decorative arts, African art, and the art of Rickey and Ivan Meštrović. The museum has increased its emphasis on acquiring, exhibiting and interpreting works created by African-American, Native American, Latino/a and female artists.

Loving also has been a driving force in the museum’s outreach to the local and campus communities, creating the Ashbaugh Education Center and expanding the staff to four full-time education curators. The museum serves more than 15,000 public and parochial students annually through an array of social and educational offerings, which includes programming for adults as well. More than 7,000 Notre Dame students visited the Snite as part of their coursework during the 2016-17 academic year.

In partnership with the Hesburgh Libraries, the Snite received a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support efforts that will provide unprecedented digital access to museum and library collections for teaching and research. 


The University plans to have a new director in place to oversee the construction of the Raclin Murphy Museum of Art at Notre Dame, to be located at Angela Boulevard and Eddy Street on the southern edge of campus. The new museum building has been made possible by a leadership gift from Ernestine Raclin and her daughter and son-in-law Carmen and Christopher Murphy, as well as members of the Snite Museum of Art Advisory Council. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2020.

The new museum will join the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center, Hayes Family Sculpture Park, Matthew and Joyce Walsh Family Hall of Architecture and O’Neill Hall of Music as part of an emerging arts district on the south side of campus. 

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NDnano announces new center director https://news.nd.edu/news/ndnano-announces-new-center-director/ news_83140 2018-01-19T13:00:00-0500 Brandi Klingerman Alan Seabaugh, Frank M. Freimann Professor of Electrical Engineering, has been named the director of the University of Notre Dame’s Center for Nano Science and Technology (NDnano).

NDnano announces new center director

Brandi Klingerman

Alan Seabaugh, Frank M. Freimann Professor of Electrical Engineering, has been named the director of the University of Notre Dame’s Center for Nano Science and Technology (NDnano). As the new director, he will lead a center that supports more than 70 NDnano-affiliated faculty members from across nine departments in the colleges of engineering and science to grow the scale and stature of the University’s nanotechnology research efforts.

In discussing his new role, Seabaugh said, “Since its founding in 1999, NDnano has focused on connecting researchers from various backgrounds working towards common interests. I look forward to continuing to grow the center in line with these traditional efforts but also to support endeavors in new disciplines and explore other ways NDnano can make an impact.”

Previously, Seabaugh served as the director of the Midwest Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery (MIND) and then the Center for Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST). Seabaugh will be the NDnano’s second director, following founding director Wolfgang Porod, Frank M. Freimann Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

“Since the inception of NDnano, the nanotechnology field has grown substantially at Notre Dame. We are indebted to Wolfgang Porod for his leadership since 2001,” said Robert J. Bernhard, vice president for research and professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering. “We are very fortunate to have someone with Alan’s leadership experience and international reputation to lead the continued growth of NDnano. Nanotechnology is increasingly an important element of new applications, and we expect that this center will support faculty from a broad spectrum of the University in their scholarly endeavors.”

In preparation for the position, Seabaugh has been meeting with each of the center’s members to learn about their ongoing projects and future nanoscale research aspirations.

“Through these meetings, I have gained a new appreciation of the tremendous potential we have at Notre Dame for multidisciplinary research. NDnano already has what is hardest to find — outstanding faculty and researchers, state-of-the-art facilities and no shortage of ideas about the future,” said Seabaugh.

Seabaugh’s own research interests are in nanoelectronic devices and circuits, particularly on energy efficient transistors for computing, ionic memory for learning systems and rectifiers for energy conversion. He is looking forward to advancing collaborations across NDnano, allowing Notre Dame researchers to address larger scientific questions and engineering grand challenges in environmental sustainability, security and health. Additionally, he would like to enhance the support and mentoring of early career faculty.

NDnano promotes collaborative research in science and engineering to address unsolved scientific and technical questions with an aim to promote the greater good. Advances in imaging and characterization, synthesis, growth and nanofabrication are enabling breakthroughs in all science and engineering disciplines. NDnano is where Notre Dame faculty, researchers and students meet to broaden understanding, discuss multidisciplinary research opportunities and shape future research directions.

To learn more about the center, its members and its research, please visit nano.nd.edu.


Contact:

Brandi R. Klingerman / Communications Specialist

Notre Dame Research / University of Notre Dame

bklinger@nd.edu / 574.631.8183

research.nd.edu / @UNDResearch

About Notre Dame Research:

The University of Notre Dame is a private research and teaching university inspired by its Catholic mission. Located in South Bend, Indiana, its researchers are advancing human understanding through research, scholarship, education, and creative endeavor in order to be a repository for knowledge and a powerful means for doing good in the world. For more information, please see research.nd.edu or @UNDResearch.

Originally published by Brandi Klingerman at nano.nd.edu on January 16, 2018.

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Our robot future? Notre Dame lecture series explores artificial intelligence and the human community https://news.nd.edu/news/our-robot-future-notre-dame-lecture-series-explores-artificial-intelligence-and-the-human-community/ news_83210 2018-01-19T09:00:00-0500 Carol Elliott Ten Years Hence, an annual lecture series sponsored by the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, will explore advances in AI and the potential implications for the human community.

Our robot future? Notre Dame lecture series explores artificial intelligence and the human community

Carol Elliott

From Siri and Alexa to driverless cars and robots, artificial intelligence and the many devices AI inhabits are well integrated into our everyday lives. But as the technology advances, ethical and moral questions arise. 

Ten Years Hence, an annual lecture series sponsored by the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, will explore advances in AI and the potential implications for the human community. The series “Automation, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence: The Decade Ahead” takes place on select Fridays from 10:40 a.m. to 12:10 p.m. in Mendoza’s Jordan Auditorium.

The Ten Years Hence speaker series explores issues, ideas and trends likely to affect business and society over the next decade. Students, faculty and the community use guest speaker comments as a springboard for structured speculation about emerging issues and the next decade.

The talks are free and open to the public.

The full schedule is as follows:

Jan. 26: Jim Schmiedeler, professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering,
University of Notre Dame. Schmiedeler — whose research focuses on robotics, human biomechanics and the intersection of the two — will present “Ubiquitous Robots? Challenges and Opportunities.”

Feb. 23: Nitesh Chawla, Frank M. Freimann Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Notre Dame. Chawla’s research focuses on data science, machine learning and network science. He is especially interested in driving technological innovations to augment human intelligence toward the goal of benefiting the common good.

March 2: Otto Berkes, chief technology officer, CA Technologies. Berkes is responsible for technical leadership and innovation, further developing the company’s technical community, and aligning its software strategy, architecture and partner relationships to deliver customer value.

March 23: Steve Shute, executive vice president and chief business officer, SAP Americas and Asia Pacific Japan. Shute will discuss “Enabling the Intelligent Enterprise with the Next Generation of Technologies,” which explores topics such as machine learning, immersive experience and Blockchain.

April 13: Hendrik F. Hamann, senior manager and distinguished research staff member, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. Hamann’s current research interests include sensor networks, sensor-based physical modeling, machine learning, artificial intelligence and big data technologies. An IBM master inventor, he holds more than 110 patents and 100-plus pending patent applications.

April 20: Gill Bejerano, associate professor of developmental biology, computer science and pediatrics, Bejerano Lab, Stanford University. Bejerano operates the Bejerano Lab, which studies genome function in humans and related species.

April 27: Charles Calderaro III, senior vice president, global manufacturing, BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc. Calderaro is responsible for the strategic oversight and leadership of a diverse international manufacturing network, which utilizes small molecule, biotechnology and gene therapy technologies to deliver clinical and commercial products to patients.
 

Ten Years Hence, sponsored by the O’Brien-Smith Leadership Program, is made possible by a generous endowment from alumnus William H. O’Brien and his wife, Dee. The program is named after their respective parents. The endowment provides an opportunity for students and faculty to interact with distinguished leaders from business, government and nonprofit sectors.

For more information, visit the Ten Years Hence website.

Contact: Jean Meade, Mendoza College of Business project administrator, 574-631-3277, jean.meade@nd.edu

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Helen Kovacs https://news.nd.edu/news/helen-kovacs/ news_83211 2018-01-19T09:00:00-0500 Melissa Jackson Helen Kovacs, retiree, died Jan. 11. Services have passed.…

Helen Kovacs

Melissa Jackson

Helen Kovacs, retiree, died Jan. 11. Services have passed.

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Board governance focus of 2018 Nonprofit Breakfast Series https://news.nd.edu/news/board-governance-focus-of-2018-nonprofit-breakfast-series/ news_83156 2018-01-17T15:00:00-0500 Erin Blasko The 2018 Nonprofit Breakfast Series will take place at Mendoza on the second Tuesday of each month beginning in February, with breakfast from 7 to 8 a.m. and presentations from 8 to 9:30 a.m.

Board governance focus of 2018 Nonprofit Breakfast Series

Erin Blasko

The University of Notre Dame Office of Public Affairs and Mendoza College of Business will host a four-part breakfast series designed to help nonprofit organizations and community volunteers recruit, educate and retain a committed and effective board of directors.

The 2018 Nonprofit Breakfast Series will take place at Mendoza on the second Tuesday of each month beginning in February, with breakfast from 7 to 8 a.m. and presentations from 8 to 9:30 a.m.

“Having a functional, engaged board requires great energy and commitment. This series has been designed to educate and arm nonprofit leaders as well as board members with the tools they need to make a positive impact,” said Jessica Brookshire, associate director of public affairs at Notre Dame.

The schedule is as follows:

• Feb. 13: “Nonprofit Board Governance: Learning for Mission Effectiveness,” featuring Thomas Harvey, former director of nonprofit professional development at Mendoza.

• March 13: “Maximizing Communication with Your Board to Get More Done,” featuring Alice Obermiller, associate director of experiential learning and concurrent assistant teaching professor at Mendoza.

• April 10: “The Essential Nuts and Bolts to Build a Better Nonprofit Board,” featuring Marc Hardy, director of nonprofit certificate education at Mendoza.

• May 8: “Productive Board Meeting: How to Get More Done in Half the Time,” featuring John Tropman, Henry J. Meyer Collegiate Professor of Social Work emeritus at the University of Michigan.

The cost for all four sessions is $100 and includes breakfast, parking and a copy of the book “Board Governance” by Harvey and Tropman. Each session will include a Q&A with the presenter.

To register, visit https://shop.nd.edu/C21688_ustores/web/classic/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCTID=3761&SINGLESTORE=true.

Contact: Erin Blasko, assistant director of media relations, 574-631-4127, eblasko@nd.edu

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Marc Breitman and Nada Breitman-Jakov named 2018 Richard H. Driehaus Prize laureates https://news.nd.edu/news/marc-breitman-and-nada-breitman-jakov-named-2018-richard-h-driehaus-prize-laureates/ news_83138 2018-01-17T13:00:00-0500 Mary Beth Zachariades Marc Breitman and Nada Breitman-Jakov, Paris-based architects known for improving cities through quality architecture and urbanism, have been named the recipients of the 2018 Richard H. Driehaus Prize at the University of Notre Dame.

Marc Breitman and Nada Breitman-Jakov named 2018 Richard H. Driehaus Prize laureates

Mary Beth Zachariades

Marc Breitman and Nada Breitman-Jakov, Paris-based architects known for improving cities through quality architecture and urbanism, have been named the recipients of the 2018 Richard H. Driehaus Prize at the University of Notre Dame. They will be awarded the $200,000 prize during a ceremony on March 24 (Saturday) in Chicago.

Torsten KulkeTorsten Kulke

In conjunction with the Driehaus Prize, Torsten Kulke, chair of the Society for the Rebuilding of the Historical New Market Dresden in Germany, will receive the $50,000 Henry Hope Reed Award, given annually to an individual working outside the practice of architecture who has supported the cultivation of the traditional city, its architecture and art.

“In contrast to current conventions of flawed experimentation in public housing, the Breitmans’ work stands out for its beauty and dignity,” said Michael Lykoudis, Driehaus Prize jury chair and Francis and Kathleen Rooney Dean of Notre Dame’s School of Architecture. “The public-private partnerships in which the Breitmans have engaged show the power of public officials to transform cities by carefully selecting architects and urban planners who are sensitive to the needs of citizens who experience the built environment on a daily basis.”

The jury citation states, “Unlike so many recent urban interventions, the work of the Breitmans takes its place in and inspiration from historical cities, breathing new life into beloved and time-tested architectural and urban patterns. Their developments contribute momentously to the enterprise of creating and preserving attractive and thriving urban communities that are sustainable, accessible, and that elevate the cultural life of their denizens.”

A native of Belgium, Nada Breitman-Jakov attended the L'École de la Cambre in Brussels, receiving degrees in both architecture and urban planning. Marc Breitman was born in Paris and received an architecture degree from the École des Beaux-Arts. Together, the two formed Breitman and Breitman, an architecture and urban planning studio, in 1989. Their projects range from residences, schools, hotels and commercial blocks to entire neighborhoods.

The Richard H. Driehaus Prize at the University of Notre Dame was established in 2003 to honor lifetime contributions to traditional, classical and sustainable architecture and urbanism in the modern world. The prize is awarded annually to a living architect whose work has had positive cultural, environmental and artistic impact in keeping with the highest ideals of classical architecture in contemporary society.

Also honored at the March 24 award ceremony will be the Henry Hope Reed Award laureate Torsten Kulke, chair of the Gesellschaft Historischer Neumarkt Dresden (GHND), for his outstanding leadership in the reconstruction of the destroyed Neumarkt.

When Kulke undertook the project to rebuild the historic city center in Dresden in 1999, the Neumarkt area had been largely empty for more than 50 years.

“Torsten Kulke had the vision to see that Dresden could become a vibrant city once again, respectful of its own rich history, and he overcame significant political opposition to his plan,” said Richard H. Driehaus, founder and chairman of Chicago-based Driehaus Capital Management LLC. “Through private investment and careful project management, Torsten accomplished an extraordinary feat, and Dresden has become a model of redevelopment for cities and towns around the world.”

The jury citation reads, “The reconstruction of the Historical Neumarkt at Dresden over the past two decades is an extraordinary achievement that has been met with astonishment and delight around the world. It is unique in Germany and indeed in the world in its ambition to resuscitate the lost historic heart of a city destroyed decades ago by war.  It is hoped that this recognition will reinforce Kulke’s and the GHND’s authority and encourage other projects of reconstruction and new traditional architecture in and around Dresden as well as similar remarkable initiatives already underway in Berlin, Frankfurt-am-Main, and Potsdam.”

This year’s Driehaus Prize and Reed Award laureates were selected by a jury composed of Adele Chatfield-Taylor, president emerita of the American Academy in Rome; Robert Davis, developer and founder of Seaside, Florida; Paul Goldberger, contributing editor at Vanity Fair; Léon Krier, architect and urban planner; Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, founding principal of DPZ; Demetri Porphyrios, principal of Porphyrios Associates; and Witold Rybczynski, Meyerson Professor Emeritus of Urbanism at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Contact: Amanda Skofstad, assistant director of media relations, 574-631-4313, skofstad@nd.edu

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Notre Dame students, faculty and staff to join 2018 March for Life https://news.nd.edu/news/notre-dame-students-faculty-and-staff-to-join-2018-march-for-life/ news_83114 2018-01-16T13:00:00-0500 Notre Dame News More than 1,000 University of Notre Dame students and 65 faculty and staff will travel in a 19-bus caravan to participate in the 2018 March for Life on Jan. 19 (Friday) in Washington, D.C.

Notre Dame students, faculty and staff to join 2018 March for Life

Notre Dame News

More than 1,000 University of Notre Dame students and 65 faculty and staff will travel in a 19-bus caravan to participate in the 2018 March for Life on Jan. 19 (Friday) in Washington, D.C. This year’s march observes the 45th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion.

Notre Dame’s 2018 March for Life contingent is the largest in recorded memory and will include University President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C. Father Jenkins will also preside at a Mass for the Notre Dame marchers at 10 a.m. Friday at St. Agnes Catholic Church, 1910 N. Randolph St., Arlington, Virginia.

O. Carter Snead, professor of law and William P. and Hazel B. White Director of the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture, said: “Notre Dame’s extraordinary participation in the March for Life is one of the most prominent outward signs that the Blessed Mother's University is committed to building a culture of life, where every unborn child, along with her mother and father, is protected by law and surrounded by love and support throughout all of life’s journey.”

A Mass with special intention for those traveling to the March for Life will be celebrated Jan. 18 (Thursday) at 5:15 p.m. in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. On Jan. 23 (Tuesday), students, staff and faculty will gather at 12:30 p.m. at the Grotto to pray the Rosary at the Alumni Association’s annual Respect for Life Prayer Service. Prayer intentions may be submitted here.

Contact: Amanda Skofstad, assistant director of media relations, 574-631-4313, skofstad@nd.edu

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McGrath Institute receives Lilly Endowment grant for parish ministry enrichment programs https://news.nd.edu/news/mcgrath-institute-receives-lilly-endowment-grant-for-parish-ministry-enrichment-programs-2/ news_83112 2018-01-16T11:00:00-0500 Meg Mirshak The McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame has been awarded $1 million by Lilly Endowment Inc. to expand programs for ordained and lay pastoral leaders in a shifting ministry landscape.

McGrath Institute receives Lilly Endowment grant for parish ministry enrichment programs

Meg Mirshak

The McGrath Institute for Church Life at the University of Notre Dame has been awarded $1 million by Lilly Endowment Inc. to expand programs for ordained and lay pastoral leaders in a shifting ministry landscape. As recipient of planning funds for the Thriving in Ministry Initiative, the McGrath Institute will expand its summer program for diocesan priests and initiate a program that supports the professional and pastoral leadership development of lay ministers early in their careers.

The Thriving in Ministry Initiative supports a variety of religious organizations across the nation as they create or strengthen programs that help pastors build relationships with experienced clergy who can serve as mentors and guide them through key leadership challenges in congregational ministry. The McGrath Institute is one of 24 organizations receiving grants totalling more than $20 million from the initiative.

“The shifting trends in Church ministry signal a strong need for programs dedicated to ongoing formation, support, and mentorship of leaders entrusted with teaching and shepherding Catholics across the United States and globe,” said John Cavadini, McGrath-Cavadini Director of the McGrath Institute for Church Life. “The generosity of Lilly Endowment will generate long-lasting impact and bear abundant fruit for the life of the Catholic Church.”

With the Lilly Endowment grant, the McGrath Institute will continue the Bishop D’Arcy Program in Priestly Renewal, which began in 2016 to provide a weeklong retreat for about a dozen diocesan priests on the Notre Dame campus. The program seeks to support leader priests so that they can form and mentor younger priests who are fewer in number but will be asked to do more for longer during their ministerial careers. Since 1965, the number of U.S. Catholic priests has dropped 36 percent, according to the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate. Of the 37,000 priests today, just over 60 percent are active in ministry compared to 94 percent active priests in 1965.

The second initiative of the planning grant will address the rising total of lay professional ministers in the United States. Since 1995, the number of lay professional ministers has increased from 11,000 to 23,000, according to CARA. An additional 23,000 are enrolled in lay ecclesial formation programs.

The Strong Foundations for Pastoral Leaders Program will support pastoral leaders as they seek to balance the early years of their career in ministry with familial and financial commitments. The program will host two different groups of 12 to 18 young lay leaders during the summer at Notre Dame. The participants will spend four days attending a conference alongside more experienced ministers and another four days in a leadership development seminar focused on the early years of their career. The young leaders will benefit from experienced mentors who will work with them for several years.

“Many pastors are seeking role models and wise colleagues who can guide them through professional transitions and challenges encountered in particular ministry contexts,” said Christopher L. Coble, Lilly Endowment’s vice president for religion. “Our hope is that this grant to the McGrath Institute for Church Life will support a new wave of efforts that help clergy thrive and lead their congregations more effectively.”

Each of the McGrath Institute programs will place special emphasis on serving priests and leaders from the Black Catholic and Hispanic Catholic populations. The institute will work with the National Black Catholic Congress and diocesan partners in the southeast and southwest where Hispanic populations are growing disproportionately to the number of Hispanic pastoral leaders. A series of online courses will be developed by 2022 to meet the need for theological and pastoral education for Spanish-speaking Catholics among other needs in the Church.

Contact: Brett Robinson, director of communications, McGrath Institute for Church Life, 574-631-6109, brobins6@nd.edu.

Originally published by Meg Mirshak at icl.nd.edu on January 16, 2018.

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Nanovic Institute awards Laura Shannon Prize to ‘The Work of the Dead’ https://news.nd.edu/news/nanovic-institute-awards-laura-shannon-prize-to-the-work-of-the-dead/ news_83080 2018-01-16T09:00:00-0500 Kristian Olsen The Nanovic Institute for European Studies at the University of Notre Dame has awarded the 2018 Laura Shannon Prize in Contemporary European Studies to Thomas W. Laqueur for his book “The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Mortal Remains,” published by Princeton University Press.

Nanovic Institute awards Laura Shannon Prize to ‘The Work of the Dead’

Kristian Olsen

The Nanovic Institute for European Studies at the University of Notre Dame has awarded the 2018 Laura Shannon Prize in Contemporary European Studies to Thomas W. Laqueur for his book “The Work of the Dead: A Cultural History of Mortal Remains,” published by Princeton University Press.

 

The Laura Shannon Prize, one of the preeminent prizes for European studies, is awarded each year to the best book in European studies that transcends a focus on any one country, state or people to stimulate new ways of thinking about contemporary Europe as a whole. This year’s cycle of the award considered books in humanities published in 2015 or 2016.

 

“The Work of the Dead,” which examines the ways the dead have been treated in western Europe since the 18th century, was praised highly by the final jury:

 

The Work Of The Dead

The dead matter to us; they always have. But, as Thomas W. Laqueur demonstrates in “The Work of the Dead,” why and how the dead matter has changed over time. Subtitled “A Cultural History of Mortal Remains,” this fascinating book transcends a focus on any one country, state, people, or historical moment to consider how and why the living have cared for the dead from antiquity through the twentieth century. In clear and graceful prose, Laqueur examines his subject matter through lenses that are at times anthropological, historical, and philosophical in nature. The depth and breadth of his scholarship are particularly noteworthy. A monumental achievement, “The Work of the Dead” contains a vast reservoir of historical information and insights regarding cultural practices surrounding the treatment of the dead that scholars from many disciplines will draw upon for years to come.

 

Thomas W. Laqueur, who is Helen Fawcett Professor of History at the University of California Berkeley, also does research in British social history, medical history and the history of sexuality, and he has written numerous books and articles on these topics. He will visit Notre Dame during the fall semester of 2018 to accept the prize, deliver a public lecture and meet with students and faculty.

 

The Shannon Prize jury also awarded honorable mention to Richard Bourke for his book “Empire & Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke,” published by Princeton University PressRichard Bourke is professor in the history of political thought at Queen Mary University of London. The jury commended his book, stating:

 

Richard Bourke’s “Empire & Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke” is a significant and carefully researched study of a towering figure in eighteenth-century European history and politics: Edmund Burke, the great rhetorician, politician, and political theorist. While some have dismissed Burke as irredeemably conservative, Bourke has recovered the political reformer, the opponent of colonial exploitation and royal overreach, and the unstinting advocate for oppressed peoples. To the image of Burke as a supporter of class distinctions, an “open aristocracy,” and a parliamentary monarchy, Bourke brings a great deal of nuance. One of the great achievements of this book is the author’s attention to Burke’s remarkable style and rhetoric — treating them not merely as secondary matters, but as integral components of his message. Well-grounded in the sources, clear in its methodological approach, and elegantly written, “Empire & Revolution” richly repays the effort of those willing to engage a study of this detail and density. It is a paragon of intellectual history.

 

The jury for this year’s prize consisted of a distinguished group of scholars. Members of the final jury included: James Chandler, Barbara E. & Richard J. Franke Distinguished Service Professor and Director of the Franke Institute for the Humanities, University of Chicago; William Donahue, John J. Cavanaugh, C.S.C., Professor of the Humanities, University of Notre Dame; Dennis Doordan, professor of architecture and design and associate dean of research, scholarship, and creative work in the School of Architecture; Heather Dubrow, John D. Boyd, S.J., Chair in the Poetic Imagination, Fordham University; and Mark Lilla, professor of humanities, Columbia University.

 

Now in its ninth year, the Laura Shannon Prize is made possible through a generous endowment from Michael and Laura Shannon of Houston, Texas. Laura serves on the Nanovic Institute’s Advisory Board and Michael, who graduated from Notre Dame in 1958, serves on Notre Dame’s Graduate Studies and Research Advisory Council.

 

The Nanovic Institute for European Studies at the University of Notre Dame is committed to enriching the intellectual culture of Notre Dame by creating an integrated, interdisciplinary home for students and faculty to explore the evolving ideas, cultures, beliefs and institutions that shape Europe today. The institute is an integral part of Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs. For additional information about the Nanovic Institute and the Laura Shannon Prize, visit nanovic.nd.edu/prize.

 

For questions about the prize, contact LauraShannonPrize@nd.edu.

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Martin Luther King Jr. Day Candlelight Prayer Service https://news.nd.edu/news/martin-luther-king-jr-day-candlelight-prayer-service/ news_83094 2018-01-16T09:00:00-0500 Andy Fuller The third annual Walk the Walk Week began with the candlelight prayer service in the Main Building rotunda.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day Candlelight Prayer Service

Andy Fuller

The third annual Walk the Walk Week began with the candlelight prayer service in the Main Building rotunda. The event closed Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on campus while kicking off a week of events designed to foster dialogue and reflection on making Notre Dame a more inclusive community.

 

Speakers encouraged faculty, staff and students in attendance to consider the example of Dr. King in their everyday lives. “Let us ask that we can be a better, stronger, more respectful, loving community here at Notre Dame,” said University president Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., in a prayer to open the service. Attendees marched with candles in hand to the Sacred Heart statue on Main Quad to conclude the service.

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