Notre Dame News https://news.nd.edu/ Notre Dame News gathers and disseminates information that enhances understanding of the University’s academic and research mission and its accomplishments as a Catholic institute of higher learning. en-us 2017-11-17T22:12:34+0000 Robert H. Schuler https://news.nd.edu/news/robert-h-schuler/ news_81944 2017-11-17T15:00:00-0500 Melissa Jackson Zahm Professor Emeritus Robert H. Schuler, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, died Nov. 13. The family will receive friends from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. on Nov. 20 (Monday) at Hickey Chapel at Palmer Funeral Home, 17131 Cleveland Road…

Robert H. Schuler

Melissa Jackson

Zahm Professor Emeritus Robert H. Schuler, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, died Nov. 13. The family will receive friends from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. on Nov. 20 (Monday) at Hickey Chapel at Palmer Funeral Home, 17131 Cleveland Road, South Bend. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. on Nov. 21 (Tuesday) in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be sent to:

                Sacred Heart Parish

                104 Sacred Heart Parish Center

                University of Notre Dame

                Notre Dame, IN 46556

 

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Notre Dame moves up to No. 3 in the nation for study abroad participation https://news.nd.edu/news/notre-dame-moves-up-to-3-in-the-nation-for-study-abroad-participation/ news_81853 2017-11-16T14:00:00-0500 Joya Helmuth The Institute for International Education ranked the University of Notre Dame third among doctorate-granting universities for undergraduate participation in study abroad during the academic year 2015-16. 

Notre Dame moves up to No. 3 in the nation for study abroad participation

Joya Helmuth

The Institute for International Education ranked the University of Notre Dame third among doctorate-granting universities for undergraduate participation in study abroad during the academic year 2015-16. This represents an increase from the University’s ranking of No. 4 last year in the annual Open Doors report.

Notre Dame International’s study abroad office manages over 50 semester study abroad programs in 25 countries around the world. The Open Doors report compares the number of students studying abroad to the number of degrees conferred in a given year in estimating study abroad participation. Using this measure, an estimated 75.2 percent of the graduating class participated in study abroad in 2015-16.

​"These results reflect not only the University’s commitment to international education, but our students’ strong desire to learn beyond the U.S. border and experience other cultures as an integral part of their Notre Dame education," said Warren von Eschenbach, associate vice president and assistant provost for internationalization. “With three out of every four students now studying abroad at some point during their undergraduate career, we are advancing our goal of educating future leaders prepared to address the needs and opportunities of a global world.”

Open Doors is conducted by the Institute of International Education with the support of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the U.S. Department of State. More information can be found online.

 

Originally published by Joya Helmuth at international.nd.edu on November 13, 2017.

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Colombian peace agreement progressing steadily, says Kroc Institute report https://news.nd.edu/news/colombian-peace-agreement-progressing-steadily-says-kroc-institute-report/ news_81897 2017-11-16T11:00:00-0500 Renée LaReau The report highlights significant progress in achieving short-term goals of a bilateral ceasefire, surrender of weapons and creation of institutional and legal mechanisms for verification.

Colombian peace agreement progressing steadily, says Kroc Institute report

Renée LaReau

Nearly one year after the Colombian government and the rebel group FARC signed a historic peace accord, the fulfillment of nearly half its commitments is underway, according to a report issued Nov. 16 (Wednesday) by the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.

 

“Our research shows a strong commitment from both sides to ending the conflict and moving toward peace, though some obstacles remain,” said David Cortright, director of the Kroc Institute’s Peace Accords Matrix (PAM).  

 

“The pace of implementation is on par or slightly superior to other peace agreements, and if current obstacles are overcome, this process is on a path toward success,” said research professor Madhav Joshi, who collaborated with colleagues Jason Quinn and Cortright on the Notre Dame study.

 

The Kroc Institute, an integral part of Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs, has been asked to provide technical verification and monitoring of implementation of the accord through its PAM research project. Its first report on the Colombian peace agreement reflects data collected between December 2016 and August 2017.

 

“We’ve been offering rigorous academic research to all involved parties as a form of peacebuilding accompaniment,” Cortright said.

 

Data is collected through on-the-ground observation and investigation by a mobile team of peacebuilding professionals based in Colombia.

 

The report highlights significant progress in achieving short-term goals of a bilateral ceasefire, surrender of weapons and creation of institutional and legal mechanisms for verification.

 

Greater progress is needed, however, in the implementation of longer-term objectives such as security guarantees, the socio-political reintegration of former combatants, the substitution of illicit crops and implementation of truth and reconciliation processes.

 

Among the findings:

 

  • Implementation activity has been initiated in 45 percent of the 558 stipulations in the accord, with no activity observed yet for 55 percent of the stipulations as of Aug. 31.
     
  • Approximately 17 percent of the stipulations in the accord have been fully implemented, with 6 percent at an intermediate level of implementation and 22 percent at a minimal level of implementation.
  • 61 percent of the provisions related to reparations to victims have not been initiated. Thirty-three percent of the provisions related to the promotion of a culture of respect for human rights and the protection of human rights defenders are in the initial phase of implementation.
     
  • 73 percent of the provisions related to the reincorporation of FARC-EP into civilian life (economically, socially and politically) have been partially or completely implemented, while 26 percent have not been initiated.
     
  • No activity has been observed in more than 80 percent of the provisions related to democratic participation and social participation guarantees, which weakens public support and commitment and could delay the implementation in other areas of the accord.

 

PAM is the world’s leading academic center for measuring the progress of peace agreements on a systematic comparative basis. Its involvement in the Colombian peace process marks the first time its researchers have measured the implementation of a peace accord in real time.

 

“Our evidence-based approach provides an impartial scientific assessment of the implementation status across the whole accord, identifying both advances and gaps,” said Quinn.

 

The Colombian peace agreement has been compared to the Good Friday Agreement that ended the conflict in Northern Ireland. The Colombian accord brings an end to a 52-year conflict — the longest in the Western Hemisphere.

 

“It’s a tremendous honor to assist in monitoring the implementation of this historic accord, which is laying the foundation for peace and progress in the months and years ahead,” Cortright said.

 

Contact: Amanda Skofstad, assistant director of media relations, 574-631-4313, skofstad@nd.edu

 

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Football weekend events: Notre Dame vs. Navy https://news.nd.edu/news/football-weekend-events-notre-dame-vs-navy/ news_81878 2017-11-15T14:00:00-0500 Erin Blasko Lectures on the morality of capitalism and World War II and American literature and a recital featuring Notre Dame Junior Alex Mansour on cello are among the many events surrounding this weekend’s home football game against Navy.

Football weekend events: Notre Dame vs. Navy

Erin Blasko

Lectures on the morality of capitalism and World War II and American literature and a recital featuring Notre Dame Junior Alex Mansour on cello are among the many events surrounding this weekend’s home football game against Navy.

Friday, Nov. 17

• “Making Everything Out of Anything: Prints, Drawings and Sculptures by Willie Cole,” 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, through Nov. 26, O’Shaughnessy Galleries II and III, Snite Museum of Art.

• “Rembrandt’s Religious Prints: the Feddersen Collection at the Snite Museum of Art,” 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, through Nov. 26, O’Shaughnessy Gallery West, Snite Museum of Art.

• “Building Bridges of Faith,” photographic depictions of papal visits to the Holy Land, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to midnight Sunday, through Dec. 9, first floor, Hesburgh Library.

• Mass, 6:45 to 7:45 a.m., Sacred Heart Crypt; 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., 5:15 to 6:15 p.m., Basilica of the Sacred Heart.

• Football Fridays at the Eck, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Eck Visitors Center Patio.

Boardroom Insights Lecture, featuring Crane Kenney, president of business operations, Chicago Cubs, 10:40 a.m. to 12:10 p.m., Jordan Auditorium, Mendoza College of Business.

• “Is Capitalism Moral?” featuring Notre Dame alumnus James Otteson, chair in business ethics and professor of economics at Wake Forest University, and Patrick Deneen, David A. Potenziani Memorial Associate Professor of Constitutional Studies at Notre Dame, noon to 1:45 p.m., Jenkins Hall and Nanovic Hall Forum.

• IDEA Center Innovation Rally, featuring Aisling MacRunnels, chief marketing officer, Synack, 12:30 to 2:30 p.m., IDEA Center, Innovation Park.

• Gallery Tour: Highlights of the Snite Museum of Art, 1 to 1:45 p.m., entrance atrium, Snite Museum of Art.

• Book signing and behind-the-scenes tour and display of sports-related items from the University Archives, featuring archivists Charles Lamb and Elizabeth Hogan, authors of “Notre Dame at 175: A Visual History,” 2:15 to 3:15 p.m. and 3:15 to 4:15 p.m., 607 Hesburgh Library. Space is limited. To secure a spot, visit bit.ly/2uimqEN.

• “Alex Mansour: A Junior Recital,” featuring Notre Dame junior Alex Mansour on cello, 7 to 8 p.m., Leighton Recital Hall, DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.

• 24th annual “Concert of the Missions” benefiting Yancana Huasy, a Holy Cross Mission in Lima, Peru, featuring the Notre Dame Folk Choir, 8 to 9 p.m., Basilica of the Sacred Heart.

Saturday, Nov. 18

Saturdays with the Saints, “St. Nicholas — Miracle Worker and Gift Giver,” featuring Lawrence S. Cunningham, O’Brien Professor of Theology Emeritus, 10:30 to 11:30 a.m., Andrews Auditorium, Geddes Hall.

• Dooley Society Lectures, “Drill Like a Champion Today,” featuring Mike Jung, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Jordan Hall Auditorium 101.

• Game Day Rosary, 11:30 a.m. to noon, Basilica of the Sacred Heart.

Saturday Scholar Series, “Total Mobilization: World War II and American Literature,” featuring Roy Scranton, assistant professor of English, 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., Annenberg Auditorium, Snite Museum of Art.

• Postgame Mass, 30 minutes after the game, Basilica of the Sacred Heart; DeBartolo Performing Arts Center; Monogram Room (monogram winners and guests only).

Sunday, Nov. 19

• Mass, 6:30 to 7:30 a.m., 9:30 to 10:30 a.m., 11 a.m. to noon, Sacred Heart Crypt; 8 to 9 a.m., 10 to 11 a.m., 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m., Basilica of the Sacred Heart.

For more information, visit gameday.nd.edu.

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3-D projection video presentation postponed https://news.nd.edu/news/3-d-projection-video-presentation-postponed/ news_81858 2017-11-15T10:00:00-0500 Dennis Brown A part of Notre Dame’s celebration of its 175th anniversary, the video will be presented at a later date.

3-D projection video presentation postponed

Dennis Brown

“Under the Dome: Celebrating 175 Years of Notre Dame,” a 3-D mapping projection video scheduled for presentation Nov. 17 and 18 (Friday and Saturday) on the University’s Main Quad, has been postponed due to weather.

A part of Notre Dame’s celebration of its 175th anniversary, the video will be presented at a later date.

Projection mapping is a technology that turns often irregularly shaped objects such as buildings into a display surface for video projection. The creators can add artistic dimensions, optical illusions and notions of movement to enhance the viewing experience. “Under the Dome” will use the architecture of the Main Building and Basilica of the Sacred Heart as a canvas to bring to life pivotal moments in the University’s history.

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Notre Dame establishes Office of Military and Veterans Affairs https://news.nd.edu/news/notre-dame-establishes-office-of-military-and-veterans-affairs/ news_81832 2017-11-15T08:00:00-0500 Sue Lister The office will expand the University’s support for Notre Dame-enrolled veterans and their families, active-duty and ROTC students and those who are dependents of service members.

Notre Dame establishes Office of Military and Veterans Affairs

Sue Lister

Long recognized as a leader in training students preparing for military careers and as a partner to the United States military, the University of Notre Dame has strengthened its commitment to those who have served our country by establishing its new Office of Military and Veterans Affairs (OMVA).

The office will expand the University’s support for Notre Dame-enrolled veterans and their families, active-duty and ROTC students and those who are dependents of service members.

“The bonds between Notre Dame and the U.S. military predate the American Civil War and have grown stronger over many years, as successive generations of Notre Dame graduates and Holy Cross priests have served our nation in times of war and peace,” said Thomas G. Burish, Charles and Jill Fischer Provost. “With this new office, we will further strengthen our commitment to serving those who have given so much to our nation and the University. I am grateful to the Military and Veteran Initiative Steering Committee, whose members led this initiative.”

Under the direction of Regan Jones, a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who came to Notre Dame in 2014, the OMVA will focus on growing the military-connected undergraduate and graduate student populations and developing targeted services to meet their unique needs. It will also coordinate and lead Notre Dame’s multidisciplinary efforts to support these students and will work collaboratively with representatives from others areas of the University, including ROTC, admissions, student affairs, the Graduate School, financial aid, First Year of Studies and other departments. 

“We believe Notre Dame can achieve singular distinction as one of the nation’s best universities for veterans, military, ROTC and their families,” said Laura Carlson, vice president and associate provost and chair of the Military and Veteran Initiative Steering Committee. “In Regan Jones, a highly decorated Marine Corps veteran who has spent the past three-plus years getting to know the University from a variety of perspectives, we have the ideal leader to direct us in this endeavor.”

“Since Sept. 11, 2001, more than 3.8 million veterans have served in the U.S. military,” Jones said. “The Office of Military and Veterans Affairs will ensure that those military-connected individuals within the Notre Dame community experience the gratitude that we have for their sacrifice for our country and feel fully supported in their academic pursuits.”

The office’s strategic plan sets goals of making the Notre Dame experience robust, inclusive and vibrant for military-connected students and enabling the University to be a leading model of engagement for this student population. Among other things, this will entail actively recruiting more veterans and military-connected individuals for undergraduate and graduate enrollment, providing multiple pathways for academic and personal success, preparing these students for post-graduation pursuits, ensuring timely degree completion and becoming an employer of choice for veterans.

Establishing the OMVA writes a new chapter in the University’s long history with the U.S. military, which includes service by thousands of alumni, students and priests from Notre Dame’s founding religious community, the Congregation of Holy Cross. One of those priests, Rev. William Corby, C.S.C., who would later become University president, served as chaplain to the Union Army’s Irish Brigade during the Civil War and famously gave absolution to the troops at Gettysburg as they prepared for battle.

During World War II, more than two-thirds of the Notre Dame student body enlisted, and a Navy program hosted on campus trained 12,000 officers. After the war, a housing complex known as Vetville was built near where the Hesburgh Library now stands to accommodate veterans returning to school with their families.

In the 1950s, Notre Dame was among the first universities to host all three ROTC branches of the military. Outside of the military academies, the ROTC program is today among the national leaders in graduating commissioned officers.

Currently Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business MBA program enrolls 38 veterans as part of the Yellow Ribbon Program. This past summer, the University hosted a cohort of the Warrior-Scholar Project, through which 15 veterans and active-duty military members spent a week with Notre Dame faculty and administrators preparing for enrollment in colleges and universities around the country.

To learn more about Notre Dame’s resources for military-connected students, visit the OMVA website at omva.nd.edu.

Contact: Regan Jones, director of military and veterans affairs, 574-631-9074, reganjones@nd.edu

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IT professor wins 'young researcher' award https://news.nd.edu/news/it-professor-wins-young-researcher-award/ news_81837 2017-11-14T16:00:00-0500 Carol Elliott University of Notre Dame Assistant Professor Idris Adjerid recently was recognized with the “Young Researcher” award during the annual Conference on Health IT and Analytics.

IT professor wins 'young researcher' award

Carol Elliott

University of Notre Dame Assistant Professor Idris Adjerid recently was recognized with the “Young Researcher” award during the annual Conference on Health IT and Analytics (CHITA held Nov. 3-4 in Washington, D.C. The event, the longest-running conference for research on the economics of healthcare IT and analytics in the information science field, was hosted by the Center for Health Information & Decision Systems.

Adjerid, an assistant professor in the Department of IT, Analytics, and Operations (ITAO) at Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, studies the economics of privacy and the impact of health information technology on patient outcomes and healthcare costs. 

His recent research includes the study of the use of a Health Information Exchange (HIE) — a system that allows healthcare professionals to access and share a patient’s vital medical information electronically — and Medicare spending. Adjerid and co-authors Corey Angst of Notre Dame and Julia Adler-Milstein of the University of California, San Francisco, found that an HIE potentially could save billions of tax dollars if implemented nationally. 

Adjerid’s work has been published in Management Science, Information Systems Research, MIS Quarterly, American Psychologist and other top research journals. He received a Ph.D. in information systems from the Heinz College of Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University and both an MBA and B.S. in business information technology from the Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech. 

Prior to pursuing his doctoral studies, Adjerid worked as a senior analyst at the Government Accountability Office in Washington, D.C., with a focus on privacy, security and data mining. He teaches courses at the Mendoza College of Business on the strategic uses of information technology and network security and privacy.

Originally published by Carol Elliott at mendoza.nd.edu on November 13, 2017.

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New study shows disadvantage for firms possessing celebrity and status https://news.nd.edu/news/new-study-shows-disadvantage-for-firms-possessing-celebrity-and-status/ news_81831 2017-11-14T11:00:00-0500 Shannon Roddel Research from Tim Hubbard shows that possessing multiple social approval assets might not always be beneficial for firms. 

New study shows disadvantage for firms possessing celebrity and status

Shannon Roddel

Businesses that have attracted lots of positive media coverage and are also affiliated with high-status venture capitalists or underwriters may seem like poster children for corporate success. But new research from the University of Notre Dame shows this kind of attention may be too much of a good thing.

 

The study “Safe Bets or Hot Hands? How Status and Celebrity Influence Strategic Alliance Formations by Newly Public Firms” defines the media attention aspect as “celebrity” and the venture capitalist and underwriter affiliations as “status.” Together, they serve as lenses that influence how people process other information about a firm, according to researcher Tim Hubbard, assistant professor of management in Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business. But possessing both assets—celebrity and status together—is actually more of a disadvantage than possessing one or the other.

 

“We show that possessing multiple social approval assets might not always be beneficial,” says Hubbard. “The relative predictability of high-status firms conflicts with the rebel nature of celebrities. It’s like looking through two different—and incompatible—lenses at the same time.”

 

This challenges the assumption that accumulating such assets is always beneficial. The study— co-authored by Timothy Pollock, Michael Pfarrer and Violina Rindova and forthcoming in The Academy of Management Journal—shows that managers need to think about these assets in context.

 

The researchers studied 347 internet tech startups that went public in the late 1990s and early 2000s, looking at whether they had celebrity and/or high status. They examined how many strategic alliances each firm had one year after going public, based on how potential alliances viewed the firm’s underpricing (change in stock price on the first day of trading).

 

While celebrities were plentiful during this period, not all had high status. For example, MapQuest, Peapod, Salon and VerticalNet were all darlings, but were not backed by the highest status actors. Some—such as Pets.com, E-loan and Infoseek—were able to attain both celebrity and high status. All of these firms had varying degrees of success in attracting strategic alliance partners.

 

“Celebrity played a big part in alliance formation when the firm had high underpricing, where the stock price experienced a ‘pop’ on the first day of trading,” Hubbard says, pointing to software and consulting services company Ariba as an example. The stock price almost tripled on its first day of trading in January 2002. By the end of its first year, it had 23 strategic alliances, compared to the average number of 2.4 alliances for sample firms in the study.

 

“We also discovered that firms with both celebrity and high status had fewer partners one year after their initial public offering,” says Hubbard. High status firms had 1.65 fewer alliances if they had celebrity, compared to if they didn’t.

 

“It changes our perspective on how these two intangible resources influence stakeholders,” he says. “Instead of only considering the baseline benefits of status or celebrity, we need to look at how these assets color stakeholders’ perceptions of other information.”

 

Hubbard hopes the research can help managers better understand the nuances of intangible assets.

 

“Viewing a firm through two different lenses can be difficult,” he says. “Rather than trying to gather every intangible asset, managers should consider which ones complement their organization. Not every firm needs to be a celebrity, and not every celebrity needs to have high status.”

 

 

Contact: Tim Hubbard, 574-631-0802 or thubbard@nd.edu

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Stephen Tapp https://news.nd.edu/news/stephen-tapp/ news_81817 2017-11-13T16:00:00-0500 Melissa Jackson Stephen Tapp, a system administrator specialist in Campus Technology Services, died Nov. 11. …

Stephen Tapp

Melissa Jackson

Stephen Tapp, a system administrator specialist in Campus Technology Services, died Nov. 11. 

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NDSP to accept food donations as payment for parking tickets https://news.nd.edu/news/ndsp-to-accept-food-donations-as-payment-for-parking-tickets/ news_81816 2017-11-13T15:00:00-0500 Erin Blasko Each donated food item will be worth $2 in fine payments.

NDSP to accept food donations as payment for parking tickets

Erin Blasko

University of Notre Dame Security Police will accept nonperishable food donations as payment for parking tickets or fines from Nov. 13 (Monday) to Dec. 8 (Friday) — part of an effort to address food insecurity in the community.

This is the second year for the Food for Fines program, which collected 3,000 pounds of food, representing $5,700 in fines, in 2016.

Each donated food item will be worth $2 in fine payments. There will be a limit of 30 food items per person, for a maximum value of $60.

The program is open to students, faculty, staff or visitors with outstanding parking and/or traffic tickets.

Donated food will go to People Gotta Eat, a partnership of 14 food pantries in St. Joseph County that works through the United Way to share resources, raise funds and promote awareness.

People are asked not to donate expired food items.

For more information, call 574-631-5053.

Contact: Erin Blasko, assistant director of media relations, 574-631-4127, eblasko@nd.edu

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