Notre Dame News https://news.nd.edu/ Notre Dame News gathers and disseminates information that enhances understanding of the University’s academic and research mission and its accomplishments as a Catholic institute of higher learning. en-us 2018-08-18T02:14:32+0000 Free Flick on the Field returns Aug. 24 https://news.nd.edu/news/free-flick-on-the-field-returns-aug-24/ news_89853 2018-08-17T15:00:00-0400 Sue Ryan “Rudy” returns to the big screen at Notre Dame Stadium on Aug. 24 (Friday) when the University of Notre Dame hosts its second annual Flick on the Field.

Free Flick on the Field returns Aug. 24

Sue Ryan

“Rudy” returns to the big screen at Notre Dame Stadium on Aug. 24 (Friday) when the University of Notre Dame hosts its second annual Flick on the Field. This free community event features a showing of the sports movie on the stadium video board.

Prior to the movie, fans will be entertained by music and can make purchases at some of the stadium concession stands. Students from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s College and Holy Cross College with wrist bands for the event will be allowed to sit on the football field to watch the movie. Students are permitted to bring blankets on the field, but food and drinks on the field are prohibited. Other attendees may sit in the stadium bowl. Seating will be general admission.

Gates will open at 6:30 p.m. Guests should use Gate A for general admission seating, and students must enter the stadium via the Rockne Gate tunnel entrance (across from Hesburgh Library) for access to the field. The movie will begin at 7:30 p.m.

Backpacks, duffel bags, and tote bags are not permitted in the stadium.  All items are subject to inspection upon entrance, including Diaper & Medical bags, blankets, coats and ponchos.

 

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Notre Dame launches new graduate degree in business analytics https://news.nd.edu/news/notre-dame-launches-new-graduate-degree-in-business-analytics/ news_89170 2018-08-17T10:00:00-0400 Carol Elliott The one-year graduate degree program, which will begin classes on the Notre Dame campus in fall 2019, is intended for “pre-professional” students with little or no work experience.

Notre Dame launches new graduate degree in business analytics

Carol Elliott

Applications are being accepted for the new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) launched by the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business. The one-year graduate degree program, which will begin classes on the Notre Dame campus in fall 2019, is intended for “pre-professional” students with little or no work experience.

“We’ve been running our MS in Business Analytics Chicago program for working professionals with great success, and over the years we’ve seen a number of applicants who would benefit greatly from an MSBA, but who did not fit the profile of that program,” said Rob Easley, John W. Berry Sr. Professor of Business and chair of the Information Technology, Analytics, and Operations Department. “They were either recent graduates that didn’t have the work experience, or international students interested in the STEM degree who wouldn’t be able to work while earning their degree.

“This new program, running a standard academic year on the Notre Dame campus, will allow both of those groups to benefit from the rigorous analytics curriculum we’ve honed over the years, as well as the excellent international reputation of the Mendoza College of Business,” Easley added.

The Notre Dame MSBA is an intense, 31-credit-hour program that includes 27 hours of required courses and four credit hours of electives. The program’s goal is to provide a rigorous education in applying analytical techniques to massive data sets to solve business problems — knowledge that has become critically important due to revolutionary advances in information technology.

The coursework includes foundational classes such as data management, predictive analytics and machine learning, as well as specific applications in sports analytics, marketing research, emerging issues in analytics and data storytelling. The program also provides focused career planning and coaching.

“In addition to learning about cutting-edge data analytics, our MSBA students have the opportunity to explore the ethical dimensions of collecting and analyzing data to promote business as a force for good in society,” said ”https://mendoza.nd.edu/research-and-faculty/directory/katherine-spiess/“>Katherine Spiess, associate dean for Graduate Programs at Mendoza. “And, as members of the Notre Dame family, our graduates join one of the most loyal and engaged alumni networks in the world.”

Intended either as a “fifth year” for students just completing their undergraduate degrees, or for those with limited work experience, MSBA prerequisites to application include a GMAT or GRE score (waived for Notre Dame students), and at least one course each in statistics, accounting and an additional business course in finance, management or marketing.  Business undergraduates (other than Business Analytics majors) are welcome to apply, as are students from a range of backgrounds, including science business majors, or economics majors with a business minor.

Scott Nestler, associate teaching professor and data analytics expert, will serve as the MSBA academic director.

Mendoza will continue offering its non-residential MSBA-Chicago program for working professionals at its campus located at 224 S. Michigan Street in downtown Chicago.

The Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame is a premier Catholic business school that fosters academic excellence while promoting business as a force for good in society. A leader in values-based education with the message of Ask More of Business™, the College offers innovative coursework that integrates real-life case studies, a faculty renowned for teaching and research, international study opportunities, and interactions with some of the foremost business thought leaders.

Mendoza degree programs include top-ranked Undergraduate Studies, which offers six majors – Accountancy, Finance, IT Management, Business Analytics, Management Consulting and Marketing – as well as nine graduate business degrees programs: Notre Dame MBA, Executive MBA, Executive MBA-Chicago, MS in Accountancy, MS in Business Analytics, MS in Business Analytics-Chicago, MS in Finance-Chicago, MS in Management and the Executive Master of Nonprofit Administration. The College also offers several dual-degree graduate programs, including the Notre Dame MBA/Master of Science in Business Analytics degree, as well as custom and open-enrollment program in executive education and nonprofit administration. Mendoza.nd.edu

Contact: Carol Elliott, director of newswriting, Mendoza College of Business, 574-631-2627, Elliott.37@nd.edu

Originally published by Carol Elliott at mendoza.nd.edu on August 16, 2018.

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Day of Community introduces new students to local community https://news.nd.edu/news/day-of-community-introduces-new-students-to-local-community/ news_89831 2018-08-17T09:00:00-0400 Erin Blasko New students will visit with a variety of local organizations Monday (Aug. 20) as part of Day of Community, an annual Welcome Weekend event that introduces first-year and transfer students to opportunities for engagement with the local community.

Day of Community introduces new students to local community

Erin Blasko

Newly arriving University of Notre Dame students will visit with a variety of local organizations Monday (Aug. 20) as part of Day of Community, an annual Welcome Weekend event that introduces first-year and transfer students to opportunities for engagement with the local community.

The students will depart campus by bus from Stepan Center, visit with the organizations and then return to campus by bus. Destinations will be assigned by residence hall, and the day will be divided into shifts: the first shift will be from 10 a.m. to noon and the second shift will be from 1 to 3 p.m.

Now in its third year, Day of Community introduces newly arriving Notre Dame students to a variety of service, education and arts and culture organizations throughout the South Bend area. Students become familiar with the great work being done in South Bend and learn about opportunities to get involved during their time at Notre Dame.

With the help of the Center for Social Concerns, Welcome Weekend has partnered with the following organizations for this year’s event: The Boys & Girls Clubs of St. Joseph County, South Bend Center for the Homeless, Unity Gardens, Food Bank of Northern Indiana, Reins of Life Inc., St. Joseph County Parks, Near Northwest Neighborhood Inc., St. Margaret’s House, St. Adalbert School, La Casa de Amistad, City of South Bend Venues Parks & Arts, Hannah & Friends, Robinson Community Learning Center, ND-LEEF, Healthwin, South Bend Cubs, Downtown South Bend, enFocus and Holy Cross House.

“The annual Day of Community introduces Notre Dame students to local businesses and nonprofit organizations to help foster a better understanding of who they are and what they do. It is our hope that through this experience, Notre Dame students will feel more comfortable partnering with these organizations and in many cases volunteering their time,” said Lauren Donahue, program director for new student engagement. “The South Bend community is full of rich and vibrant opportunities for our students to work, learn and serve, and I hope this experience serves as the beginning of their involvement with the place they will call home for the next four years.”

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg said, “Cities and universities are at their best when they find unity of purpose with one another. Sound Bend is proud to be a destination, a home and a research space for Notre Dame students and faculty. Day of Community strengthens our communities’ mutual support for one another.”

Contact: Erin Blasko, assistant director of media relations, 574-631-4127, eblasko@nd.edu

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Developing an 'on and off' switch for breast cancer treatment https://news.nd.edu/news/developing-an-on-and-off-switch-for-breast-cancer-treatment/ news_88819 2018-08-17T07:30:00-0400 Brandi Klingerman Notre Dame researchers are working to create nanoparticles that act as an “on and off” switch to improve the safety and effectiveness of CAR-T cell therapy.

Developing an 'on and off' switch for breast cancer treatment

Brandi Klingerman

T-cells play an important role in the body’s immune system, and one of their tasks is to find and destroy infection. However, T-cells struggle to identify solid, cancerous tumors in the body. A current cancer therapy is using these T-cells and genetically engineering them to kill cancer, but these cells, known as CAR-T cells, have been known to attack off-target sites while completing their job. In order to counteract this negative effect, University of Notre Dame researchers are working to create nanoparticles that act as an “on and off” switch to improve the safety and effectiveness of this cancer therapy.

This research is being led by Prakash D. Nallathamby, research assistant professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering and affiliated member of NDnano, specifically to target breast cancer, which is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women. At Notre Dame, Nallathamby works to promote the use of nanoparticle-enabled technologies, and his research focuses on the synthesis of nanomaterials, biomedical imaging, cancer biology, and targeted therapeutics and diagnostic tools.

For this project, Nallathamby’s research team will use a specific type of CAR-T cells and make it so those cells will deactivate after the cancerous tumor has been eliminated. To accomplish this, the researchers are developing a double-sided nanoparticle that has an architecture designed for one part to bind to the surface of a tumor while the other part can capture and activate the CAR-T cells.

“The nanoparticle that we will develop will act as a biomarker for the CAR-T cells to identify the tumor, but after a period of time the nanoparticle will dissipate from the tumor surface,” said Nallathamby. “Once the nanoparticle is gone, this will act as an off switch for our modified CAR-T cells. The degraded nanoparticles are small enough to exit the body via renal clearance.”

Beyond adding an on-and-off function, the research team will also aim to improve upon the traditional CAR-T cell therapy by using universal CAR-T (uCAR-T) cells. Currently, CAR-T cells are made by removing T-cells from a specific patient and then genetically engineering them to target solid tumors. However, this process takes approximately 30 days to complete before administering treatment. Since uCAR-T cells are not derived from individual patients, they will be more readily available.

NallathambyProfessor Nallathamby

“Besides the safety risks of using the typical CAR-T cell therapy, it is also time-consuming to develop and there is little control over the speed at which CAR-T cells kill a tumor,” said Nallathamby. “Through this research, our goal is to address each of these concerns by using uCAR-T cells in combination with our proprietary modular double-sided nanoparticles to create a more manageable process for those giving and receiving the treatment.”

Although this research targets breast cancer tumors, it has the potential to be applicable to other cancers that cause solid tumors to form. Additional collaborators on this research include Lance Hellman, research assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry and affiliated member of the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI), and Paul Helquist, professor of chemistry and biochemistry and affiliated member of HCRI

The project is funded by an initiation grant through the Notre Dame Research Faculty Research Support Program. This grant program was created to provide seed funding to established faculty initiating new programs of research, scholarship or creative endeavor. To learn more about the grant program, application requirements and past recipients, visit https://research.nd.edu/our-services/funding-opportunities/faculty/internal-grants-programs/faculty-research-support-program—-initiation-grant/

Contact: Brandi R. Klingerman, research communications specialist, Notre Dame Research, bklinger@nd.edu, 574-631-8183; @UNDResearch

Originally published by Brandi Klingerman at research.nd.edu on Aug. 15.

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Historically black schools pay more to issue bonds, researchers find https://news.nd.edu/news/historically-black-schools-pay-more-to-issue-bonds-researchers-find/ news_88816 2018-08-16T11:00:00-0400 Carol Elliott After examining the underwriting fees — the fees that underwriters charge a school to bring a bond offering to investors — Paul Gao and his co-authors found that HBCU issuance costs were about 20 percent higher than for non-HBCUs.

Historically black schools pay more to issue bonds, researchers find

Carol Elliott

A new study from the University of Notre Dame found that historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) pay higher fees to issue tax-exempt bonds than non-HBCUs. And the evidence points to racial discrimination as the cause.

This was the finding of Paul Gao, Viola D. Hank Associate Professor of Finance at Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, and co-authors Casey Dougal of Drexel University, William J. Mayew of Duke University and Christopher A. Parsons of the University of Washington. The researchers published their findings in “What’s in a (School) Name? Racial Discrimination in Higher Education Bond Markets,” forthcoming in the Journal of Financial Economics.

The research paper tests the theory begins with the reasoning that “economic development deters the expression of discrimination, racial or otherwise,” which originally was set forth in economist Milton Friedman’s book “Capitalism and Freedom.” Therefore, it should be unlikely that a “product” such as the municipal bond market would exhibit signs of racial discrimination.

The researchers discovered evidence to the contrary.

They collected information from a 23-year (1988-2010) sample of 4,145 tax-exempt municipal bond issues, totaling approximately $150 billion. Of the 965 colleges and universities involved, 102 were HBCUs.

After examining the underwriting fees — the fees that underwriters charge a school to bring a bond offering to investors — Gao and his co-authors found that HBCU issuance costs were about 20 percent higher than for non-HBCUs. A $30 million bond issuance would cost an HBCU about $290,000, compared to $242,000 for a non-HBCU. The difference appears to be due to the fact that it was more difficult for underwriters to find buyers for the HBCU bonds.

The papers considers numerous factors that could possibly explain the difference other than race, such as school attributes, credit ratings and state tax breaks. But Gao and colleagues ultimately conclude that racial animus was the primary driver. Further, the effect was even more pronounced in the Deep South states of Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi, which rank highest in racial resentment and opposition to affirmative action as measured in the Cooperative Congressional Election Study survey and racially biased social media. The researchers found that HBCUs in those states were paying underwriters three times more to place their bonds relative to HBCUs in other states.

The paper presents several potential solutions to the problem, from lowering the price point for investors to enter this market, to making the associated state tax benefit transferable, to a federal law that designates HBCU bonds as triple tax exempt, applying to federal, state and local taxes.

Originally published by Carol Elliott at mendoza.nd.edu on July 26.

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Keough School introduces new undergraduate global affairs major https://news.nd.edu/news/keough-school-introduces-new-undergraduate-global-affairs-major/ news_89173 2018-08-16T11:00:00-0400 Ti Lavers A supplementary major in global affairs, designed for students interested in exploring contemporary global issues, will be offered to this year’s incoming class of 2022.

Keough School introduces new undergraduate global affairs major

Ti Lavers

The Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame has launched a new program of study for undergraduates. A supplementary major in global affairs, designed for students interested in exploring contemporary global issues, will be offered to this year’s incoming class of 2022.

“Introducing Notre Dame undergrads to the complex and challenging world of global affairs is an exciting phase in the rapid growth of the Keough School,” said R. Scott Appleby, Marilyn Keough Dean. “Our students care deeply about giving back — lending their remarkable talents and enterprising spirit to the task of fighting poverty, making peace, promoting human rights and addressing climate change. They will do so through the lens of human dignity. Incorporating the expertise of our interdisciplinary institutes and centers, they will take a holistic and ethically sound approach to global ‘problem-solving.’”

The global affairs major is a rigorous, 30-credit-hour program that provides students with foundational knowledge of the major political, economic and social institutions of the 21st century. Students choose from one of five areas of concentration, drawn from the diverse programs and scholarship within the Keough School’s institutes: Asian studies, European studies, international development studies, Irish studies and peace studies.

The global affairs coursework emphasizes the study of contemporary global issues within the context of integral human development, the centerpiece of the Keough School’s mission, advancing a holistic vision for human dignity and flourishing.

Global affairs, as a supplementary major, is designed to enhance and complement a student’s primary major at Notre Dame. Students are required to pair the Keough School’s global affairs major with another major from one of the University’s other colleges and schools, in fields related to the humanities, science, business, medicine or engineering. Undergraduates who study global affairs can find jobs in both the public and private sector, in embassies or international organizations like the United Nations, and in nongovernmental and service organizations.

Students who cannot fit a supplementary major into their schedules, but are interested in contemporary global issues, may enroll in one of the minors offered within the Keough School, take courses or pursue international research and language study with one or more of the Keough School’s nine institutes and centers.

For more information about the global affairs major or other undergraduate opportunities, visit keough.nd.edu/undergrad or contact Denise Ayo, associate director of undergraduate programs, at dayo@nd.edu.

Founded in 2014, the Donald R. Keough School of Global Affairs advances integral human development through research, policy and practice; transformative educational programs; and partnerships for global engagement.

Contact: Colleen Sharkey, assistant director of media relations, csharke2@nd.edu

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McGrath Institute’s Science and Religion Initiative wins Vatican Foundation Award https://news.nd.edu/news/mcgrath-institutes-science-religion-initiative-wins-vatican-foundation-award/ news_88812 2018-08-16T09:15:00-0400 William G. Schmitt Four scholars at the University of Notre Dame’s McGrath Institute for Church Life have been named winners of a 2018 Expanded Reason Award in Teaching.

McGrath Institute’s Science and Religion Initiative wins Vatican Foundation Award

William G. Schmitt

Four scholars at the University of Notre Dame’s McGrath Institute for Church Life, whose initiative advances a dialogue between religion and science education for Catholic school students, have been named winners of a 2018 Expanded Reason Award in Teaching.

The Joseph Ratzinger-Benedict XVI Vatican Foundation and the Universidad Francisco de Vitoria jointly honored John Cavadini, McGrath-Cavadini Director, along with three leaders of the McGrath Institute's Science and Religion Initiative, for innovation expanding horizons of reason in the spirit of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI.

The foundation and the Madrid-based university bestow two Expanded Reason Awards in the teaching category and two in the research category. Each annual award, which carries a prize of 25,000 Euros (approximately $30,000), seeks to build what the organizations call an “expanded reason community” embodying the integrated vision of truth expressed by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI.

“We are humbled to receive this award and very grateful for the recognition of our work,” said Cavadini, past chair of Notre Dame's Department of Theology, following the announcement in July. “We will pursue our work with renewed vigor and dedication.”

The three additional recipients — professional specialist Christopher T. Baglow and program co-directors Patricia Bellm and Jay Martin — implement the Science and Religion Initiative’s unique seminars and workshops. These approaches have helped secondary school teachers and others around the nation cultivate students’ understanding of science and Catholicism as complementary.

Baglow, Bellm, Cavadini and Martin will receive their Expanded Reason Award on Sept. 24 at the Pontifical Academy of Sciences on the Vatican grounds. Their award is one of four that will be presented as part of an international symposium exploring the dialogue between science, philosophy and theology in academia today.

The Science and Religion Initiative, now conducting its fifth year of programs, provides week-long seminars on the Notre Dame campus, as well as day-long seminars hosted by dioceses. Presentations by experts in scientific disciplines and matters of faith culminate in planning sessions that invite the teachers in attendance to think about their high school classes in new ways. 

“Modern culture prompts many students to see scientific rationalism as incompatible with religion,” says Bellm, “but the McGrath Institute’s goal is to illuminate how different fields of study can transcend their separate boxes in light of humanity having been created in the image of God.”

This Science and Religion Initiative’s mission to pursue religious and scientific understanding in an integrated way has also attracted support from the Templeton Foundation, which continues to provide funding for the initiative.

Cavadini is professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame, where he also serves as McGrath-Cavadini Director of the McGrath Institute for Church Life. He teaches, studies and publishes in the area of patristic theology and in its early medieval reception. He has served a five-year term on the International Theological Commission and recently received the Monika K. Hellwig Award from the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities for Outstanding Contributions to Catholic Intellectual Life.

Baglow, a full professional specialist with the McGrath Institute who holds a doctorate in theology from Duquesne University, has worked on the integrative mission with students for more than a decade. He authored a high school textbook, "Faith, Science, and Reason: Theology on the Cutting Edge," and has been a presenter and planner for Science and Religion Initiative seminars.

Bellm is co-director of the Science and Religion Initiative for the McGrath Institute. Before earning her master’s of divinity at Notre Dame, she worked as a chemical engineer.

Martin, co-director of the Science and Religion Initiative, is a doctoral candidate in systematic theology at Notre Dame. His research connects Catholic theology, contemporary philosophy, psychoanalytic theory and politics. He served in Catholic secondary education before earning his master’s degree in theological studies.

Cardinal Gianfranco Ravasi, a member of the Joseph Ratzinger/Benedict XVI Vatican Foundation, will preside at the Sept. 24 celebration for all winners of the Expanded Reason Awards. He is president of the Pontifical Council for Culture.

The 2018 competition for the awards also yielded an honorable mention for Brad Gregory, the Dorothy G. Griffin Professor of Early Modern European History at Notre Dame. He was lauded for his recently published book, "The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society."

Originally published by William G. Schmitt at mcgrath.nd.edu on July 31.

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First class of accomplished leaders goes ‘back to school’ as part of Notre Dame’s Inspired Leadership Initiative https://news.nd.edu/news/first-class-of-accomplished-leaders-goes-back-to-school-as-part-of-notre-dames-inspired-leadership-initiative/ news_88834 2018-08-16T09:00:00-0400 Notre Dame News Sixteen leaders in fields ranging from global sustainability to finance, law, medicine, manufacturing and health care will arrive on campus Thursday (Aug. 16) as fellows in the first class of the new Inspired Leadership Initiative.   

First class of accomplished leaders goes ‘back to school’ as part of Notre Dame’s Inspired Leadership Initiative

Notre Dame News

Sixteen accomplished leaders in fields ranging from global sustainability to finance, law, medicine, manufacturing and health care will arrive on the University of Notre Dame campus Thursday (Aug. 16) as fellows in the first class of the University’s new Inspired Leadership Initiative.   

The yearlong program is designed to help leaders from all fields who desire to pivot from their accomplished careers to being even more powerful forces for good.

Fellows taking part in the program will draw on the University’s extensive resources in the arts, humanities, sciences, international relations, theology and many other fields, and also spend time studying abroad at Notre Dame’s Global Gateways.

“The opportunity for accomplished people from diverse backgrounds to reimagine their mission in Notre Dame’s rich and dynamic learning environment will be life-changing for participants,” said Tom Schreier, founding director of the initiative. “We expect this transformation will be every bit as profound for the University and broader global community as they are for our fellows personally.”

As part of the program, the fellows will experience a core curriculum, audit classes, attend lectures, engage with students, collaborate on projects and take an active role in the campus, local and global community.

“We are delighted to initiate this new program at Notre Dame,” said Thomas G. Burish, Notre Dame’s provost. “The first class of fellows is a diverse, talented, successful and personally generous group of individuals who wish to continue to give to their communities in new ways in the years after their retirement. We are grateful for and excited about the opportunity to be a part of their journey.”

To learn more, visit the ILI website at http://ili.nd.edu.

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Prenatal exposure to violence leads to increased toddler aggression toward mothers, study finds https://news.nd.edu/news/prenatal-exposure-to-violence-leads-to-increased-toddler-aggression-toward-mothers-study-finds/ news_88753 2018-08-15T13:00:00-0400 Amanda Skofstad Babies whose mothers experience interpersonal violence during pregnancy are more likely to exhibit aggression and defiance toward their mothers in toddlerhood, according to new research by Laura Miller-Graff and Jennifer Burke Lefever.

Prenatal exposure to violence leads to increased toddler aggression toward mothers, study finds

Amanda Skofstad

Babies whose mothers experience interpersonal violence during pregnancy are more likely to exhibit aggression and defiance toward their mothers in toddlerhood, according to new research by Laura Miller-Graff, assistant professor of psychology and peace studies, and Jennifer Burke Lefever, managing director of the William J. Shaw Center for Children and Families, both at the University of Notre Dame.

While it is fairly well-known that pregnant women have an elevated risk for domestic violence, much of the associated research focuses on the negative impact of that violence on pregnancy, labor and delivery. Miller-Graff and Lefever’s study, co-published with Amy Nuttall in The International Journal of Behavioral Development, examines the short- and long-term impact of prenatal violence (regardless of perpetrator) on children’s later adjustment outcomes. Nuttall earned her doctorate at Notre Dame in 2015 and is currently assistant professor of human development and family studies at Michigan State University.

“We wanted to map out how the impact of violence cascades over time,” Miller-Graff said. “Prenatal violence primarily affects kids via how it affects the mother.”

“Research has shown that many mothers who live in domestic violence situations have pretty strong parenting skills, but when violence affects their mental health, parenting can become more difficult as well. Infancy and early toddlerhood are key times for learning some of the core emotion regulation skills — so if moms struggle, kids struggle.”

Miller-Graff said the harmful impact of violence during pregnancy is profound and long-lasting, with discernible effects on the child as far out as 2 years old, even though the initial exposure is indirect. 

“We measured toddlers’ aggressive behavior in the home environment, which included kicking and defiance in toddlers as reported by their mothers.”

Jennifer Burke LefeverJennifer Burke Lefever

While this finding aligned with the researchers’ predictions, they were surprised to find that interpersonal violence in pregnancy did not predict children’s aggressive behaviors toward their peers — suggesting that many children are able to exhibit resilience in social relationships outside of the home.

When Miller-Graff was in graduate school, her research focused on the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on preschoolers, and she wondered whether studying an earlier phase would be more effective — not only with intervention, but also with prevention of intergenerational cycles of abuse.

She said: “Although supporting IPV-exposed preschoolers is extremely important, I often felt like we were arriving to the scene too late. The period of pregnancy is an optimal point for intervention not only because you are intervening early, but also because women are often engaged in a health care system with the most regularity of their lives. This provides a unique window where women’s risk coincides with their access to support systems — a very rare opportunity.”

When there is an opportunity to put supports in place for at-risk pregnant women, the negative impact on kids is likely to significantly decrease, according to Miller-Graff. She noted that one of many potential applications of this research is better standards of screening for violence during prenatal exams.

“When we can do this research and do it well, we stand to make a huge impact for the health of moms and young children,” she said.

Contact: Amanda Skofstad, assistant director of media relations, 574-631-4313, skofstad@nd.edu

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Growth in Notre Dame research and scholarship funding continues https://news.nd.edu/news/growth-in-notre-dame-research-and-scholarship-funding-continues/ news_88691 2018-08-09T13:00:00-0400 Brandi Klingerman The University of Notre Dame continued the steady expansion and growth of its research, scholarship and creative endeavor programs during the most recent fiscal year, recording $141.6 million in research funding. 

Growth in Notre Dame research and scholarship funding continues

Brandi Klingerman

The University of Notre Dame continued the steady expansion and growth of its research, scholarship and creative endeavor programs during the most recent fiscal year (FY), recording $141.6 million in research funding. This surpasses the $138.1 million received in FY 2017. The amount is part of a trend that has led to a 75 percent increase in external research funding awarded to Notre Dame compared to 10 years ago. 

“Despite a very competitive environment and some delays in federal grant awards that are still playing out, our faculty members successfully sustained and expanded their research programs through innovative ideas, collaborations and partnerships for research that address significant technological and societal challenges,” said Robert J. Bernhard, vice president for research and professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering. “I congratulate our hardworking researchers and administrative staff for their success in helping Notre Dame continue to advance our research programs as a force for good.”

Among the significant new research programs that were launched this year is the Applications and Systems-Driven Center for Energy Efficient Integrated Nano Technologies (ASCENT). Led by Notre Dame’s Suman Datta, Frank M. Freimann Professor of Engineering, the multi-university research collaboration, which includes Cornell University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Purdue University, Stanford University, University of Minnesota, University of California-Berkeley, University of California-Los Angeles, University of California-Santa Barbara, University of California-San Diego, University of Colorado, University of Texas-Dallas and Wayne State University, is tasked with developing next-generation technologies that increase the performance, efficiency and capabilities of future computing systems for both commercial and defense applications. 

This center, which developed out of the University’s Center for Nano Science and Technology (NDnano), the Notre Dame-led Center for Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST) and the Midwest Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery (MIND), is funded by the Semiconductor Research Corporation’s Joint University Microelectronics Program, which represents a consortium of major semiconductor and defense companies, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the Indiana Economic Development Corporation.

Additionally, Peter Burns, Henry Massman Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences and director of Notre Dame’s Center for Sustainable Energy (ND Energy), is leading a newly awarded National Nuclear Security Administration Actinide Center of Excellence. This center includes a partnership with multiple universities and aims to prioritize research that is important for stockpile stewardship – the certification that the nation’s nuclear weapons are secure and operational. Collaborating universities include Northwestern University, Oregon State University, the University of Minnesota and Washington State University. Similar to ASCENT, the Actinide Center of Excellence has a history of success, as Burns previously led an Energy Frontier Research Center at Notre Dame with funding from the Department of Energy.

Notre Dame is also leading a new National Institutes of Health program project grant. The grant’s principal investigator, Michael Ferdig, professor of biological sciences and affiliated faculty of the Eck Institute for Global Health, is partnering with the Center for Infectious Disease Research in Seattle, Washington, and the Texas Biomedical Research Institute on the project. The goal of the program is to better understand the genes in the malaria parasite that are responsible for drug resistance and virulence in order to reduce and ultimately eliminate the deadly disease.

Overall for FY18, 62.9 percent of Notre Dame’s external research awards came from federal funding while 24.2 percent was the result of foundation and other sponsor funding, and 12.9 percent came from industry awards. The University also expanded its global footprint to operating research grants in 32 countries. 

To learn more about the research, scholarship and creative endeavor at the University of Notre Dame, visit research.nd.edu

Contact: Brandi R. Klingerman, research communications specialist, Notre Dame Research, bklinger@nd.edu, 574-631-8183; @UNDResearch

 

Originally published by Brandi Klingerman at research.nd.edu on Aug. 8.

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