Notre Dame News https://news.nd.edu/ Notre Dame News gathers and disseminates information that enhances understanding of the University’s academic and research mission and its accomplishments as a Catholic institute of higher learning. en-us 2018-06-22T20:33:49+0000 Program brings kids, cops together around food https://news.nd.edu/news/program-brings-kids-cops-together-around-food/ news_87651 2018-06-22T11:00:00-0400 Erin Blasko One part law enforcement. One part youth. Add culinary professionals and garnish with fresh ingredients and food for thought. That’s the recipe for Cooking with Cops, a pilot program at the University of Notre Dame that brings local youth and law enforcement together around food.

Program brings kids, cops together around food

Erin Blasko

One part law enforcement. One part youth. Add culinary professionals and garnish with fresh ingredients and food for thought.

That’s the recipe for Cooking with Cops, a pilot program at the University of Notre Dame that brings local youth and law enforcement together to improve police-community relations, encourage healthy eating and introduce kids to careers in law enforcement and the culinary arts.

Hosted by the Morris Inn in partnership with Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP), the Robinson Community Learning Center (RCLC) and the Office of Public Affairs, the program kicked off June 9 (Saturday) with a cooking class at McKenna Hall.

Seventeen RCLC students joined with four Notre Dame police officers and four Notre Dame chefs to prepare a three-course meal consisting of panzanella (Italian bread salad), vegetable flatbread and, for dessert, strawberry-infused panna cotta.

The Italian theme was a nod to Rome, one of Notre Dame’s five Global Gateways along with Beijing, Dublin, Jerusalem and London.

In addition to actual cooking, the students learned about safety and sanitation in the kitchen to avoid illness and injury, kitchen vocabulary and the definition of a “course.”

Afterward, they left with a book, “The New Food Lover’s Companion,” bags of ingredients and instructions on how to prepare the same meal at home.

“We’re going to have a lot of fun today,” Calvin Metts, sous chef at the Morris Inn at Notre Dame, said by way of introduction. “I put together a menu for you guys that is simple, so it will give us time to talk.”

But no whistling.

“Whistling is not legal, not in a kitchen,” quipped Patrick Dahms, executive director of food, beverage and events at the Morris Inn and the Notre Dame Conference Center. “You can’t whistle.”

The vision of chef Latrice McArthur, executive director of Bella Cuisine Kids Cooking Club, Cooking with Cops started in Chicago as a way to foster positive interactions between young people and police and counter negative perceptions of law enforcement in the community.

Metts grew up in the Windy City, in a middle-class household on the west side, a largely poor and working-class area that struggles with gangs and drugs.

“For them, school was supposed to be my job,” he said of his mother, who attended college in Chicago, and father, who holds two master’s degrees.

On the advice of a jailed cousin, and with encouragement from his parents, he focused on school, earning a bachelor’s degree from St. Joseph’s College in Rensselaer, Indiana, and a culinary degree from Kendall College in Chicago.

He started working at Notre Dame, alongside Dahms and Joe Kurth, senior director of the Morris Inn and Notre Dame Conference Center, in October 2015, following stints as a cook with Intercontinental Hotel Group and a sous chef with Michael Jordan’s steakhouse.

It was around that time that Michael Jordan’s Steakhouse Executive Chef Craig Cooper, aware of his deep ties to Chicago and his desire to give back, invited Metts to participate in the Cooking with Cops program there.

Notre Dame Football season was in full swing, so he had to say no, but the invitation got him to thinking: What if he replicated the program here, with local kids?

“I pitched it to Joe and he said, ‘Run with it,’” Metts said of Kurth.

So he did, straight to Notre Dame Security Police and the Robinson Community Learning Center, an off-campus educational initiative of the University that offers tutoring and other programming to kids of all ages.

They were on board, too.

“In regards to outreach and engagement, it was perfect for us,” Capt. Rob Martinez, head of crime prevention, outreach and safety for NDSP, said of the program.

Velshonna Luckey, youth development program director at the RCLC, described the program as a unique opportunity for RCLC youth to interact with police and culinary professionals in the welcoming environment of campus.

“I can’t think of any other opportunity in South Bend for this to happen,” Luckey said.

While the program checks a number of boxes in terms of health and education, the primary objective is simple: Fostering positive relationships between police and youth around food.

Unfortunately, such work is necessary in some parts of the city, where, for reasons both good and bad, interactions with police often center on enforcement, rather than positive engagement.

That was Metts’ experience in Chicago.

Growing up as a minority in a part of the city marked by poverty and crime, he developed a distrust of law enforcement early on, he said, based on his own experiences with police as well as those of friends and family.

“When I was growing up, my interactions with the police were limited and not very positive,” he said, recalling the time he was searched and questioned at a park near his school after a woman reported him as a suspected drug dealer. The school was mostly white.

Police, conversely, struggle to counter the negative buzz around such encounters, Martinez said, whether isolated or not.

“It takes 100 good acts by police to garner any recognition, but only one bad act to give us all a bad name,” he said.

Back at McKenna Hall, the kids, wearing paper chef hats and white aprons, gathered ingredients for the panzanella and vegetable flatbread from a table at the back of the room — focaccia bread, pancetta, English cucumbers, torn basil, Meyer lemon, mascarpone spread and roasted garlic.

“It’s cool to see police officers in this type of environment, because we usually see them enforcing the law,” said Kasey Bridges, 16, a rising senior at Clay High School in South Bend.

At the same time, “I like cooking,” Bridges said. “I like to find new things to cook, to kind of experiment with what’s in the house.”

Curtis Lee, 10, a rising fifth-grader at Kennedy Primary Center in South Bend, said, “I like how you can cook stuff and give it to other people.”

The kids will return for a second class next month, marking the end of the pilot and the start of a review process to determine how best to proceed with the program, which McArthur, of Bella Cuisine, hopes to replicate nationwide.

Here, Metts would like to scale the program with local schools to reach as many students as possible.

“I feel like I’ve been lucky enough that I’ve had people who looked out for me,” he said, referring to friends, family and teachers. “Now, it’s time for me to look out for someone else."

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Fr. Jenkins responds to Administration practice of separating immigrant families at the border https://news.nd.edu/news/fr-jenkins-responds-to-administration-practice-of-separating-immigrant-families-at-the-border/ news_87558 2018-06-19T10:00:00-0400 Notre Dame News “Central to the Holy Cross education Notre Dame offers is a sense of family, centered on the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, and in that spirit I call on the Administration to end immediately the cruel practice of separating children from parents and parents from children.”

Fr. Jenkins responds to Administration practice of separating immigrant families at the border

Notre Dame News

“Central to the Holy Cross education Notre Dame offers is a sense of family, centered on the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, and in that spirit I call on the Administration to end immediately the cruel practice of separating children from parents and parents from children.”

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Notre Dame Career Fair to feature on-the-spot hiring decisions https://news.nd.edu/news/notre-dame-career-fair-to-feature-on-the-spot-hiring-decisions-3/ news_87551 2018-06-18T13:00:00-0400 Notre Dame News The fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday (June 23) at the Kroc Center, 900 W. Western Ave., South Bend.

Notre Dame Career Fair to feature on-the-spot hiring decisions

Notre Dame News

The University of Notre Dame will host a career fair to fill more than 100 full- and part-time hospitality and service industry positions as well as more than 100 temporary positions. The fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday (June 23) at the Kroc Center, 900 W. Western Ave., South Bend.

Hiring decisions will be made immediately.

Positions are available in Notre Dame Campus Dining, custodial services, the Morris Inn, parking services and St. Michael’s Laundry.

Employment benefits for University staff may include paid time off, eligibility to participate in retirement plans, use of some athletics facilities, discounts at some on-campus and off-campus facilities, discounts on cable and cellular services, free Transpo bus transportation and much more.

For more information about benefits and openings, see http://notredameservicefamily.com/.

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Notre Dame recognized in Computerworld 2018 list of 100 Best Places to Work in IT for 6th consecutive year https://news.nd.edu/news/notre-dame-recognized-in-computerworld-2018-list-of-100-best-places-to-work-in-it-for-6th-consecutive-year-2/ news_87518 2018-06-18T08:00:00-0400 Katie Rose The University of Notre Dame ranks No. 15 among large organizations in IDG’s Computerworld 2018 list of the Best Places to Work in IT.

Notre Dame recognized in Computerworld 2018 list of 100 Best Places to Work in IT for 6th consecutive year

Katie Rose

The University of Notre Dame ranks No. 15 among large organizations in IDG’s Computerworld 2018 list of the Best Places to Work in IT. The annual list recognizes the 100 top organizations that challenge their IT staffs while providing great benefits and compensation. Notre Dame will be included in coverage on Computerworld.com along with results from the 2018 Best Places to Work in IT survey.

 

We are honored and humbled to once again be recognized by Computerworld. We have worked hard to develop an IT culture at Notre Dame in which we make it a priority to take care of ourselves, our families and each other. If we do that well, we fundamentally believe that we will be happier and more focused at work, allowing us to serve our students, faculty and staff with ever-increasing levels of excellence,” said Vice President and Chief Information and Digital Officer Ron Kraemer.

 

The Office of Information Technologies (OIT) at Notre Dame continues to deliver the IT services necessary for students, faculty and staff throughout the University by delivering value, driving innovation and developing talent while closely collaborating with others teams throughout campus. OIT staff work on diverse Notre Dame initiatives from learning analytics to digital asset management to contemporary network design for new facilities, while continuing to provide outstanding support for the day-to-day technology needs of campus.

 

“Over the past couple of years, we've seen an already tight market for tech talent get even tighter,” said Computerworld executive editor Ken Mingis. “Computerworld’s 2018 Best Places to Work in IT list illustrates that the companies that offer the best working environments aren't satisfied with rolling out one or two initiatives. They seek an edge in the talent marketplace through a combination of good salaries, great benefits, ready access to training and the deployment of cutting-edge technologies. They recognize that the top tech talent can easily move to the organization that respects them best, and they are determined to be that organization.”

 

The Best Places to Work in IT list is an annual ranking of the top 100 work environments for technology professionals by IDG's Computerworld. The list is compiled based on a comprehensive questionnaire regarding company offerings in categories such as benefits, career development, training and retention. In addition, Computerworld conducts extensive surveys of lT workers, and their responses factor heavily in determining the rankings.

 

Computerworld is the leading technology media brand empowering enterprise users and their managers. Computerworld also offers guidance to IT managers tasked with optimizing client systems — and helps businesses revolutionize the customer and employee experience with new collaboration platforms.

 

Contact: Katie Rose, senior director of user services, Office of Information Technologies, katie@nd.edu, 574-631-3130

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In memoriam: Timothy O’Meara, provost emeritus https://news.nd.edu/news/in-memoriam-timothy-omeara-provost-emeritus/ news_87526 2018-06-17T17:00:00-0400 Dennis Brown Timothy O’Meara, provost emeritus, Kenna Professor of Mathematics Emeritus and Trustee Emeritus at the University of Notre Dame, died June 17. He was 90.

In memoriam: Timothy O’Meara, provost emeritus

Dennis Brown

Timothy O’Meara, provost emeritus, Kenna Professor of Mathematics Emeritus and Trustee Emeritus at the University of Notre Dame, died June 17. He was 90.

 

A member of the Notre Dame faculty since 1962, O’Meara twice served as chairman of the University’s mathematics department and served as its first lay provost from 1978 to 1996.

           

Tim O'Meara was a multi-talented professor and administrator, a world-class mathematician, a great husband and family man, a faithful Catholic, a visionary provost and a person deeply devoted to Notre Dame” said Rev. Edward A. Malloy, C.S.C., president emeritus of the University who worked directly with O’Meara for nine years. “His legacy is evident all around the campus. He will be missed.”

 

“We are deeply grateful for Tim O’Meara’s many invaluable contributions to Notre Dame,” said Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., the University’s president. “May God bless and keep him.”

           

Onorato Timothy O’Meara was born Jan. 29, 1928, in Cape Town, South Africa, on the second story of a bakery his parents, Daniel and Fiorina O’Meara, owned and operated there.

           

He was graduated from the University of Cape Town in 1947 and earned a master’s degree in mathematics there the following year.  Earning his doctoral degree from Princeton University in 1953, he taught at the University of Otago in New Zealand from 1954 to 1956 before returning to Princeton where he served on the mathematics faculty and as a member of the Institute for Advanced Study for the next six years.

           

During the early years of O’Meara’s academic career, his enthusiasm for mathematics seemed matched only by his enthusiasm for motorcycling, and on often daunting road trips he traversed the African, European and North American continents—including one 12-day round-trip from Princeton, through Wyoming, to Los Angeles, to the rim of the Grand Canyon and back to Princeton. 

 

Those nomadic days abruptly ended when he met a young woman named Jean T. Fadden of Philadelphia, whom he married in 1953. 

 

“Her first and most decisive move,” O’Meara liked to recall, “was to give me a clear choice between her and my constant companion in South Africa, Europe and America—my 1.0-litre Black Shadow motorcycle.”  All five of the O’Mearas’ children earned Notre Dame degrees.

           

O’Meara was among the distinguished Catholic scholars personally recruited by Notre Dame’s Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., early in his institutionally transformational 35-year presidency. Joining the faculty in 1962, and ironically, given the subsequent three decades of his Notre Dame career, requesting that he never be asked to take any administrative position in the University, O’Meara soon became chairman of the mathematics department.

 

In addition to his mathematical teaching and scholarship, he published magisterial works, including “Introduction to Quadratic Forms,” “Lectures on Linear Groups,” “Symplectic Groups” and “The Classical Groups and K-Theory,” co-authored with Alexander J. Hahn, professor of mathematics emeritus at Notre Dame and a former O’Meara doctoral student.

           

O’Meara was appointed Notre Dame’s first lay provost in 1978 and served as the University’s chief academic officer for the next 18 years in the administrations of both Father Hesburgh and Father Malloy. He once described his principal responsibility as “preserving the Catholic character of the University and not being afraid to say it. Some Catholic schools, in adapting to what they thought would be the best way to obtain resources from public agencies, have tried to neutralize or camouflage their heritage. We have not. Interestingly enough, the very fact that we have maintained our self-confidence in what we are has proved to be a positive factor in enabling us to find the resources we need.”

           

The numerous honors O’Meara received for such commitments include an honorary degree from Notre Dame in 1987 and the University of Dayton’s Marianist Award in 1988. In 1991 he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2008, Notre Dame’s Mathematics Library was rededicated and named in his honor. 

           

“It is clear to all of us who thought, wrote, lectured and taught at Notre Dame during the 1980s and 1990s that Tim O’Meara’s tireless efforts raised the quality of the intellectual environment at Notre Dame dramatically,” Hahn said. “Tim’s rigorous commitment to ‘superior scholarship by a superior faculty’ provided significant momentum that has enabled the University’s more recent administrations to continue to promote the pursuit of academic excellence effectively.”

 

Visitation is at 8:30 a.m. on Friday (June 22), and a funeral Mass will follow at 9:30 a.m. in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart on campus. 

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Friend or foe? Notre Dame conference explores ethical considerations of AI https://news.nd.edu/news/friend-or-foe-notre-dame-conference-explores-ethical-considerations-of-ai/ news_87513 2018-06-15T14:45:00-0400 Carol Elliott A fall conference at Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business will explore the ethical issues arising from the use of AI in business and larger culture. “Artificial Intelligence and Business Ethics: Friends or Foes?” will take place Sept. 19-20 on the University campus.

Friend or foe? Notre Dame conference explores ethical considerations of AI

Carol Elliott

Rapid advances in artificial intelligence (AI) are transforming our daily lives, from voice-powered personal assistants to driverless cars to behavioral algorithms. But while the technology seemingly develops at light speed, the ethics and moral considerations surrounding the use of AI are significantly lagging.

A fall conference at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business will explore the ethical issues arising from the use of AI in business and larger culture. “Artificial Intelligence and Business Ethics: Friends or Foes?” will take place Sept. 19-20 on the University campus.

The event is open to the public. Registration is required. Visit the conference website for information on fees, agenda, speakers, hotel reservations and location of events.

Carone700

“The reason AI is so important is that it can make and implement decisions that heretofore were the purview of humans only,” said conference organizer Timothy Carone, an associate teaching professor in Mendoza’s IT, Analytics, and Operations Department. “Over time, these decisions set up a pattern and it is this pattern we call ‘ethical behavior.’ We have only begun to explore the ethical implications to businesses of using AI to replace human decision-making and understand how to manage the new risks that come with this transformation.” 

Carone said the conference’s aim is to provide attendees with a better understanding of AI, the scope of the problems they should expect to see in businesses, and ideas of what to do to manage the risk of replacing human decision-making with AI technology.

Featured speakers include:

  • Daniel Fagella, the founder of daily newsletter TechEmergence, which serves as an industry source for business applications of AI.
  • Martin Fiore, EY Americas Tax Talent leader who has explored the implications of AI in the tax, audit and talent acquisition areas.
  • Otto Berkes, the chief technology officer for CA Technologies, one of the largest independent system software companies in the world.
  • Ryan Welsh, founder and CEO of Kyndi, a venture-backed software company that is changing the paradigm of machine intelligence and how it’s used to solve some of the world’s hardest problems.

The conference will investigate topics ranging from defining the scope of the ethical issues surrounding AI, future challenges, the implications for various areas of business (business law, talent acquisition, marketing) and potential solutions, among other subjects.

“Artificial Intelligence and Business Ethics: Friends or Foes?” is sponsored by the Mendoza College of Business and the Chase Manhattan Lecture Series, an endowment to support ethical responsibilities of business.

For more information, contact Timothy Carone, 574-631-9322 or Timothy.E.Carone.4@nd.edu, or visit the website.

The Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame is a premier Catholic business school that fosters academic excellence while promoting business as a force for good in society. The college offers innovative coursework that integrates real-life case studies, a faculty renowned for teaching and research, international study opportunities and interactions with some of the foremost business thought leaders.

Originally published by Carol Elliott at mendoza.nd.edu on June 15.

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Notre Dame receives Mellon Foundation grant to grow philosophy course into national curricular model https://news.nd.edu/news/notre-dame-receives-806-000-grant-from-the-andrew-w-mellon-foundation-to-grow-popular-philosophy-course-into-national-curricular-model/ news_87460 2018-06-14T14:00:00-0400 Josh Weinhold Philosophy professor Meghan Sullivan has received an $806,000 grant from the The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to expand her popular God and the Good Life course and adapt it into a curricular model used by faculty across the country. 

Notre Dame receives Mellon Foundation grant to grow philosophy course into national curricular model

Josh Weinhold

University of Notre Dame philosophy professor Meghan Sullivan has received an $806,000 grant from the The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to expand her popular God and the Good Life course and adapt it into a curricular model used by faculty across the country.

The three-year award will allow Sullivan to build a network of professors interested in developing or refining their own courses that teach philosophy as a way of life. It will also spur the expansion of God and the Good Life to four to five sections per year — encompassing 600 to 700 students, or one-third of the freshman class.

Meghan Sullivan Ggl Session 1200Sullivan during a class discussion.

“We’re very grateful to the Mellon Foundation for their willingness to invest in philosophy education,” Sullivan said. “Notre Dame is committed to the belief that every person can reason well about the major questions facing human lives — and we’re committed to highly innovative and collaborative teaching. This grant gives us the opportunity to share the value of philosophy with a much broader audience, to lead a growing movement in curriculum design and to pursue an ambitious dream for humanities education.”

In God and the Good Life, students have the opportunity to consider, discuss and debate what makes a life moral and what makes a life meaningful. The course tackles such issues as what justifies our beliefs, whether we should practice a religion and what sacrifices we should make for others.

Using classic philosophical arguments, real-world case studies and interactive digital tools, students search for answers and explore their beliefs in both large group discussions and small sustained dialogue groups led by undergraduate fellows who previously took the course.

The Mellon grant will fund week-long curricular development workshops held at Notre Dame each of the next three years, allow for the offering of seed grants for network institutions to start undergraduate fellow programs and provide for a two-year postdoctoral fellow who will conduct research and develop curriculum related to teaching philosophy as a way of life. Faculty will be encouraged to adapt the curricular model to fit their own institutions’ unique cultures.

Ggl Class PollStudents voting in a live poll via text message, a frequent feature of Sullivan’s class sessions.

The grant will also support the further expansion of the God and the Good Life undergraduate fellows program and fund two graduate fellowships for students interested in integrating the “way of life” form into their research and teaching.

Sullivan — who is co-leading a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute together with faculty from Wesleyan University and Fordham University on the same subjects next month — hopes to build the network across 15 colleges and universities over the course of the next three years. 

The Mellon grant, Sullivan said, represents validation that this trend in way of life philosophical education could now grow into an organized, effective movement.

“Many traditions in philosophy have aimed at helping individuals think more deeply and rigorously about the good life. With this grant, we are partnering with universities across the country to imagine new and higher-impact ways to introduce students to these traditions,” said Sullivan, who also serves as director of the University’s philosophy requirement and has a book, "Time Biases: A Theory of Rational Planning and Personal Persistence" (Oxford University Press), out next month. 

“We are developing assignments that help students to connect philosophical arguments with their own day-to-day decision-making. With innovative peer discussion leader programs, a network for faculty to collaborate on course design, and in-depth training for early-career teachers, we want to bring philosophy to life for the next generation of students."

Originally published by Josh Weinhold at al.nd.edu on June 14.

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Father Lies elected provincial superior for U.S. province of Holy Cross https://news.nd.edu/news/father-lies-elected-provincial-superior-for-u-s-province-of-holy-cross/ news_87463 2018-06-14T12:00:00-0400 Dennis Brown Rev. William M. Lies, C.S.C., vice president for mission engagement and church affairs, was elected provincial superior of the Congregation of Holy Cross, United States Province of Priests and Brothers, by the Provincial Chapter at its meeting in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.

Father Lies elected provincial superior for U.S. province of Holy Cross

Dennis Brown

Rev. William M. Lies, C.S.C., vice president for mission engagement and church affairs at the University of Notre Dame, was elected Thursday (June 14) provincial superior of the Congregation of Holy Cross, United States Province of Priests and Brothers, by the Provincial Chapter at its meeting in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.

 

As provincial superior, Father Lies will oversee the work and welfare of more than 500 priests, brothers and seminarians in the U.S. province. He succeeds Rev. Thomas J. O’Hara, C.S.C., who served for six years.

 

“I am both humbled and honored by the confidence my Holy Cross brothers have placed in me,” said Father Lies. “I accept this role in service to the Congregation and the Church, confident the Lord will guide our efforts.”

 

“Father Bill Lies served with distinction as executive director of the Center for Social Concerns and has been an invaluable partner to me in building the Office of Mission Engagement and Church Affairs as its inaugural vice president,” said Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., president of the University. “We will miss him at Notre Dame, but I know he will serve the Holy Cross community in this new role with his characteristic dedication and faithfulness.”

 

Until a new vice president for mission engagement and church affairs is named, Chuck Lamphier, director of church affairs, will lead the office.

 

Appointed to his current role in March 2012, Father Lies assisted in deepening the conversation across the academy on issues of importance to the Church. He also served as the liaison for Notre Dame to the Congregation of Holy Cross, U.S. bishops, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and its affiliates, and the Holy See, and he oversaw the University’s Tantur Ecumenical Institute in Jerusalem.

 

Father Lies served as executive director of Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns from 2002 to 2012 and taught in the Department of Political Science. He is a fellow of both the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies.

 

The U.S. Province carries out the vision of Holy Cross founder Blessed Basil Moreau to make God known, loved and served through higher education, parish and other ministries throughout the United States. In addition, the province has apostolates and missions in East Africa, Chile, Peru and Mexico.

 

The Constitutions of the Congregation of Holy Cross give the provincial superior authority over all members and houses in the province. He is elected by at least two-thirds vote of the chapter and confirmed for a six-year term by the congregation’s superior general in Rome, Rev. Robert Epping, C.S.C.

 

A native of Little Falls, Minnesota, Father Lies was born July 4, 1962, and is one of 10 children. He has a twin brother, Jim, who also is a Holy Cross priest. Father Lies earned his bachelor’s degree in English with minors in French and philosophy from Saint John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota. He entered the Congregation of Holy Cross on Aug. 15, 1988, professed first vows Aug. 12, 1989, received his master of divinity degree from Notre Dame and took final vows Aug. 28, 1993. He was ordained to the priesthood April 9, 1994.

 

Father Lies earned his doctoral degree in Latin American politics from the University of Pittsburgh. His research and teaching has focused on human rights, religion and politics in Latin America and the politics of poverty. He has given talks and lectures throughout the country, and serves on a number of related domestic and international boards. In 2013, he received Catholic Charities U.S.A.’s “Keep the Dream Alive” award that honors Martin Luther King Jr.

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Four Notre Dame students awarded U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarships https://news.nd.edu/news/four-notre-dame-students-awarded-u-s-department-of-state-critical-language-scholarships/ news_87439 2018-06-14T08:00:00-0400 Erin Blasko The CLS program is part of the U.S. government’s effort to expand the number of Americans studying and mastering critical foreign languages in the name of U.S. economic competitiveness and national security.

Four Notre Dame students awarded U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarships

Erin Blasko

Three University of Notre Dame graduate students and one Law School student have been awarded U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarships (CLS) to study critical languages abroad this summer.

The CLS program is part of the U.S. government’s effort to expand the number of Americans studying and mastering critical foreign languages in the name of U.S. economic competitiveness and national security.

The program is eight to 10 weeks long and includes intensive language instruction and structured cultural enrichment experiences designed to promote rapid language gains.

The four students are:

• Evan Gage (theology) will study Turkish in Baku, Azerbaijan.

• Patricia Hartland (creative writing) will study Urdu in Lucknow, India.

• John Karian (law) will study Persian in Dushanbe, Tajikistan.

• Catherine Perl (history) will study Arabic in Tangier, Morocco.

Gage, Hartland and Perl are part of the Graduate School. Karian is part of the Law School.

Regarding Gage, Hartland and Perl, Laura Carlson, vice president, associate provost and dean of the Graduate School, said, “Our students’ research contributions have the potential to effect meaningful and positive change around the world. We’re honored that the U.S. Department of State recognizes this as well, investing in our students’ abilities to communicate their findings in languages in which important global conversations are taking place.”

Regarding Karian, Nell Jessup Newton, professor of law and Joseph A. Matson Dean of the Notre Dame Law School, said, “Mr. Karian was placed at the Department of Justice Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section as part of our Washington, D.C., externship program. Based on his experience in that program, he decided to pursue a career in the federal government in a policy role focused on the Middle East, in which he can use his legal background. Studying Persian in Tajikistan this summer will be another important step toward this goal. As his professor I could not be happier that our first-rate experiential learning programs have played an important role in his development.”

More than 5,700 American students have benefited from the CLS program since 2006. This year’s class features more than 500 graduate and undergraduate students from more than 230 schools nationwide.

Students interested in the program can visit cuse.nd.edu/cls or graduateschool.nd.edu/research for more information.

Contact: Erin Blasko, assistant director of media relations, 574-631-4127, eblasko@nd.edu

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ND Exoneration Project assists with filing to vacate judgment in murder case https://news.nd.edu/news/nd-exoneration-project-assists-with-filing-to-vacate-judgment-in-murder-case/ news_87438 2018-06-13T15:00:00-0400 Kevin Allen Last spring, Keith Cooper inspired Notre Dame Law students with his story of determination to clear his name and reclaim his life after being wrongfully convicted of armed robbery in Elkhart, Indiana.

ND Exoneration Project assists with filing to vacate judgment in murder case

Kevin Allen

Last spring, Keith Cooper inspired Notre Dame Law students with his story of determination to clear his name and reclaim his life after being wrongfully convicted of armed robbery in Elkhart, Indiana.

His attorney, Elliot Slosar of the Exoneration Project at the University of Chicago Law School, pointed out to the audience in Eck Hall of Law at the University of Notre Dame that he was still a law student when he started working on Cooper’s case.

“There are many people out there who would love your help – even before you’re admitted (to the bar),” he said.

The students took Slosar’s words to heart and started the Notre Dame Exoneration Project, a student-run organization that worked on four cases during this past academic year.

One of those cases is making news. Again, it involves Elkhart – a city of roughly 50,000 people located a half-hour’s drive from Notre Dame’s campus.

Slosar filed a petition Wednesday (June 13) in Elkhart County Circuit Court to vacate judgment in the murder conviction of Andrew Royer, a man who says police exploited his intellectual disability to coerce him into making a false confession in 2003. The Notre Dame Exoneration Project is listed on the petition, which includes several statements from police officers who support Royer’s claims of innocence. In the petition, Slosar acknowledges three Notre Dame Law students – Molly Campbell, Paula Cardona and Alyssa Slaimen – for their important contributions to the case.

Royer had no prior criminal record before he confessed in 2003 to strangling a 94-year-old woman who lived in his Elkhart apartment building. He said afterward that he simply told police what they wanted to hear. Royer’s mother told the Indianapolis Star in an interview in 2017 that her son has the aptitude of a 12-year-old and made the confession under duress. Additionally, two witnesses have recanted their trial testimony and said their statements were the result of police coercion.

Lana Canen, Royer’s co-defendant, has already been exonerated. She was convicted in 2005 based on fingerprint evidence found at the crime scene. A judge overturned Canen’s conviction in 2012 after new analysis proved the fingerprint was not hers.

Royer has appealed his conviction three times already without success, and the Elkhart County Prosecutor’s Office has maintained that the right person was convicted of the crime. However, the Exoneration Project is hopeful the new evidence in the petition filed Wednesday will earn Royer’s freedom.

‘Truly inspiring’

Campbell, a rising third-year student at the Law School, said her participation in the Notre Dame Exoneration Project and the Royer case has been a formative experience.

“It has been an opportunity to learn from top-notch attorneys, professors, investigators and fellow students who are exceptionally generous with their time and expertise,” Campbell said. “More importantly, it has given our client hope and a dedicated team providing him with the legal assistance he needs.”

Slaimen, also a rising third-year student, said working with the Notre Dame Exoneration Project has been the most impactful and influential experience she has had at the Law School.

“From the first meeting with the Exoneration Project, I was shocked to hear about Andy’s case, and it motivated me to get more involved,” Slaimen said.

“Throughout the year, it has been truly inspiring to work with other law students, professors, investigators and attorneys who dedicate their time to fight for justice in instances when the criminal justice system has failed,” she said. “Mr. Royer’s new petition to vacate judgment gives him hope that he will be exonerated after wrongfully serving 15 years in prison.”

Notre Dame Law Professor Jimmy Gurulé, the Notre Dame Exoneration Project’s faculty adviser, said working on the petition to vacate judgment has been an invaluable experience for the Law School’s students.

“However, the ultimate goal is to correct a gross miscarriage of justice,” Gurulé said. “Moving forward, the students are firmly committed to securing the freedom of a person who was wrongfully convicted of murder and has unjustly spent 15 years in prison.”

Gurulé said Notre Dame Law students flooded into the Exoneration Project’s work during this past academic year. Students have been doing all of the work as volunteers, not for academic credit, but that will change in the fall when the Law School launches its Wrongful Conviction Externship supervised by Gurulé and Slosar.

Originally published by Kevin Allen at law.nd.edu on June 13.

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