Notre Dame News https://news.nd.edu/ Notre Dame News gathers and disseminates information that enhances understanding of the University’s academic and research mission and its accomplishments as a Catholic institute of higher learning. en-us 2018-12-15T00:00:52+0000 Three faculty awarded NEH fellowships, continuing record funding for humanities research https://news.nd.edu/news/three-faculty-awarded-neh-fellowships-continuing-record-funding-for-humanities-research/ news_95031 2018-12-13T16:00:00-0500 Amanda Skofstad Rebecca Tinio McKenna, Sarah McKibben and Vincent Phillip Muñoz have been offered fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities in the 2018 award cycle.

Three faculty awarded NEH fellowships, continuing record funding for humanities research

Amanda Skofstad

Three University of Notre Dame faculty members — Rebecca Tinio McKenna, Sarah McKibben and Vincent Phillip Muñoz — have been offered fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities in the 2018 award cycle.  

With 65 total awards, scholars in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters have received more NEH fellowships than any other private university in the United States since 1999. 

“We are incredibly proud of these three faculty members who continue Notre Dame’s remarkable success in earning NEH fellowships,” said Sarah A. Mustillo, I.A. O’Shaughnessy Dean of the College of Arts and Letters. “These awards recognize the outstanding research that is happening here across a range of disciplines, the creativity and originality of our scholars as well as the excellent support provided by the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts throughout the application process.”

Rebecca McKennaRebecca McKenna

During the 2019-20 academic year, Rebecca Tinio McKenna, assistant professor of history, will continue her research on the history of the piano.

McKenna’s project explores largely forgotten figures in the production of the instrument through the early 20th century. Among these figures are African-American musicians who gave life to the instrument in theaters and saloons, sounding notes that would sell sheet music and, in turn, the piano itself. McKenna’s research brings together historical fields often treated in isolation — music history with labor history, African-American history, business history and imperial histories.

“I am aiming to tell a history of the instrument’s manufacture in the United States together with a history of the sounds piano players produced and the stories they told across the ivory keys,” McKenna said. “In the process, I hope to show some of the connections shared by people in seemingly far-flung places — from the late 19th-century American, middle-class parlor to the ivory warehouses of Zanzibar; from a Connecticut River company town where ivory keys were made, to saloons and theaters in cities like New York, Chicago, Sedalia and New Orleans.”

Sarah MckibbenSarah Mckibben

Sarah McKibben, associate professor of Irish language and literature, will continue her research on bardic poetry in Ireland, for which she also won a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies in early 2018.

McKibben’s research focuses on Irish poets of the 16th and 17th centuries, who composed compelling artistic expressions of praise and warning — as well as satire — in the face of an antagonistic, expanding Tudor-Stuart state.

“Whether inveighing against ‘dlígheadh is fhiú aindligheadh’ (‘[English] law that is mere unlawfulness’), urging a patron to defend them ‘ar smacht ríogh’ (‘against the king’s oppression’), warning him not to be ‘meallta’ (‘wooed’) by English tricks, or comically threatening him with ‘sreath iolfháobhair raghlain rann’ (‘many bright blades of eulogistic quatrains’), bardic poets testify to the richness of the poetic tradition in confronting change,” McKibben said. “Their voices cry out to be heard, and this is why I wish to examine the native literary response to colonial transformation.”

McKibben added that she feels honored to have been selected for an NEH Fellowship for her work in Irish/Celtic studies, which is a field rarely selected for national awards in the United States.

“The award will enable me to make a significant contribution to early modern Irish language studies, a field I enjoy teaching regularly here at Notre Dame,” McKibben said.

Vincent Phillip MuñozVincent Phillip Muñoz

For Vincent Phillip Muñoz, Tocqueville Associate Professor of Political Science and concurrent associate professor of law, the NEH award will enable him to complete his forthcoming book, “Religious Freedom and the American Founding: The Natural Right of Religious Liberty, the Original Meanings of the Religion Clauses, and Our ‘First Freedom’ Today.”

Muñoz’s research examines the United States founders’ political and constitutional philosophy of religious liberty. His NEH book project will seek to recover the founders’ philosophy of governmental limits and to construct a natural-rights approach to the First Amendment’s religion clauses.

“Our founders deserve a hearing when we think about matters of religious freedom because they have something to teach us about the natural right of religious liberty,” Muñoz said. “The founders might not be able to provide answers to all of our contemporary church-state questions, but we ought to consult them and appropriate the wisdom they do have to offer.”

“The aim of my work is to help citizens and office holders better understand and respect the meaning of our God-given rights,” said Muñoz. “I’m thankful to the NEH and Notre Dame for their support, and will do my best to use this award to recover knowledge that will help serve the common good.”

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Shannon Cullinan elected executive vice president at Notre Dame; Micki Kidder, Mike Seamon appointed to newly created positions; Ann Firth promoted to vice president https://news.nd.edu/news/shannon-cullinan-elected-executive-vice-president-at-notre-dame/ news_94136 2018-12-12T12:00:00-0500 Dennis Brown Shannon Cullinan, vice president for Finance, has been elected executive vice president of the University of Notre Dame, effective July 1, by the University’s Board of Trustees, succeeding John Affleck-Graves in that position.

Shannon Cullinan elected executive vice president at Notre Dame; Micki Kidder, Mike Seamon appointed to newly created positions; Ann Firth promoted to vice president

Dennis Brown

Shannon CullinanShannon Cullinan

Shannon Cullinan, vice president for Finance, has been elected executive vice president of the University of Notre Dame, effective July 1, by the University’s Board of Trustees, succeeding John Affleck-Graves in that position.

“Shannon combines expertise in financial management with wide administrative experience and broad engagement with the academy,” Notre Dame President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., said. “Above all, he brings a deep commitment to the mission of Notre Dame. I am excited to have him in this new role.”

John J. Brennan, chair of the Board of Trustees, said: “There is no one better qualified than Shannon Cullinan to succeed John Affleck-Graves. He is already one of the reasons that Notre Dame enjoys a well-deserved reputation nationally for being a superbly managed University.”

“I am deeply humbled by this opportunity and grateful to my predecessors who wisely shaped the Executive Vice President’s Division, dating back to the original visionary, Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C.,” Cullinan said. “I also want to thank John Affleck-Graves for his extraordinary legacy of stewardship and selfless dedication to our employees, especially our staff.”

Micki KidderMicki Kidder

 As chief financial officer, Cullinan will be responsible for the Investment and Finance Offices, overseeing the University’s $13 billion endowment and $1.6 billion operating budget. He also will oversee the Offices of Information Technology, Human Resources, and Facilities, Design and Operations.

In addition, in order to better integrate key operations currently under the executive vice president, two individuals have been appointed to newly created positions, both reporting to Cullinan.

Micki Kidder will become the vice president for University Enterprises and Events. In this role, she will oversee campus dining and catering operations; lead the planning and execution of a wide range of University events

from commencement to concerts, including events around football games on and off campus; and lead university enterprises such as the Morris Inn, McKenna Hall, the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore, St. Michael’s Laundry and licensing.

Mike SeamonMike Seamon

Mike Seamon will take on the new role of vice president for Campus Safety and University Operations. In this position, he will continue to oversee Notre Dame Security Police, the Notre Dame Fire Department, Risk Management and Safety and the Emergency Management Program. He will in addition take on oversight for Building Services, Warehouse, Delivery and Transportation, the Office of Sustainability, Land O’Lakes and other operations vital to the life of Notre Dame.

Kidder and Seamon will begin their new roles March 1.

Father Jenkins also has appointed Ann Firth to the position of vice president and chief of staff to the president, effective immediately. In this position, Firth will not only manage the president’s staff and advise the president, but also assume a role in the implementation of key initiatives of the President’s Office and continue her work as liaison to the Board of Trustees.

Ann FirthAnn Firth

A 1993 Notre Dame alumnus, Cullinan returned to his alma mater in 2000, serving first as assistant vice president for Public Affairs and Communications. He went on to serve as assistant vice president for Development and associate vice president for Campus Services, with oversight of more than a dozen departments and 400 employees.

In 2011, he was named associate vice president for University Relations, where he worked closely with Trustee leadership, executive leadership, deans and the University Relations team to oversee Notre Dame’s advancement and Boldly Campaign efforts. In 2016, Cullinan was appointed vice president for Finance overseeing the Offices of Treasury Services, Budget, Financial Planning, Procurement Services, Northeast Neighborhood Development and the Controller’s Group.

Cullinan worked for four years as the associate executive director of the Center for the Homeless in South Bend, establishing it as a national model. During his tenure at the center, he served as the controller and created a commercial landscape business employing homeless men and women. He also owned and ran an advertising company before working at the center.

The recipient of a Notre Dame Presidential Leadership Award in 2012, he serves on the Community Foundation of St. Joseph County Board, Beacon Health System Foundation Board and Alliance for Catholic Education Advisory Board.

Cullinan graduated with honors from Notre Dame in 1993 with a bachelor’s degree in accountancy. He earned his master of business administration degree with highest honors from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. 

Cullinan’s wife, Sarah, also is a Notre Dame graduate. She earned her master’s degree in education through Notre Dame’s Alliance for Catholic Education. The Cullinans are the parents of four children.

A member of the University Relations senior management team in her current role as associate vice president and executive director of Development, Kidder oversees the majority of individual leadership fundraising efforts for the University, including regional fundraising and athletics advancement. She also leads the operating and administrative functions of the Development Department, including Special Events, Development Information Services, Donor Services, Finance, Human Resources, Stewardship, Prospect Management and Development Research.

In her previous roles in the Offices of the President and Executive Vice President, Kidder managed important campus-wide initiatives such as the University’s Strategic Emergency Preparedness and Response Protocol and Office of the Board Secretariat.

Kidder is a 2000 graduate of the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University and a certified public accountant. She holds a certificate of education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and will receive her Executive MBA degree from the Mendoza College of Business in May.

Prior to joining Notre Dame, Kidder led cross-functional teams in Assurance & Business Advisory Services for PriceWaterhouseCoopers.

Kidder is a member of The Stanley Clark School board and has been actively involved in the South Bend community, holding leadership roles for the Boys & Girls Clubs of St. Joseph County, Family & Children’s Center, and the Junior League of South Bend. She and her husband, Scott, are parents of three children.

Seamon was appointed to his current position in April 2016. In addition to overseeing Notre Dame Security Police, the Notre Dame Fire Department, Risk Management and Safety, Emergency Management and Game Day Operations, he shepherded the first use of Notre Dame Stadium for a major concert, featuring Garth Brooks.

A 1992 graduate of Notre Dame with a bachelor’s degree in management, Seamon earned his MBA from the University in 1994. He has served his alma mater since 1997 after previously working as director of sales and marketing for the Tampa Bay Rays of Major League Baseball.

Previously, Seamon served as assistant vice president for University Events, executive assistant to the executive vice president — for both Affleck-Graves and Rev. Timothy Scully, C.S.C. — and executive assistant to the vice president of Finance and vice president of Business Operations.

Seamon serves on the board of directors of the Logan Center and has served on the board of the Boys & Girls Clubs of St. Joseph County. He is a graduate of the South Bend/Mishawaka Leadership Program.

Firth joined the Office of the President in 2011 as associate vice president and counselor to the president and was appointed chief of staff in 2012.

She earned bachelor’s and juris doctor degrees from Notre Dame. After practicing law in Chicago, Firth returned to Notre Dame to join the Division of Student Affairs as the inaugural director of the Office of Residence Life, serving for six years as the University’s primary hearing officer for student disciplinary matters. Firth went on to serve as a member of the Student Affairs’ senior leadership team. As associate vice president for Student Affairs, she was responsible for strategic planning and assessment for the division, ensuring student welfare and safety and managing crisis communications.

Firth is the recipient of a Notre Dame Presidential Award, and she was honored by the Congregation of Holy Cross with the Howard J. Kenna, C.S.C., Award for “extraordinary contributions to Notre Dame and Holy Cross.” She is active in St. Pius X Parish, is a graduate of the South Bend/Mishawaka Leadership Program, and has served on several community boards.

Firth and her husband, John, who also holds two degrees from the University, are the parents of four Notre Dame graduates and a current Notre Dame student.

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Early career faculty awarded nationally competitive awards https://news.nd.edu/news/early-career-faculty-awarded-nationally-competitive-awards/ news_94058 2018-12-10T13:00:00-0500 Brandi Klingerman The National Science Foundation (NSF) has recognized four Notre Dame faculty members for their excellence in research with new Early Career Development (CAREER) Awards. 

Early career faculty awarded nationally competitive awards

Brandi Klingerman

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has recognized four University of Notre Dame faculty members for their excellence in research with new Early Career Development (CAREER) Awards. Over the past five years, Notre Dame faculty have received 37 of these highly competitive awards.

 

Speaking about the awards, Robert J. Bernhard, vice president for research, said, “The NSF CAREER Award competition is one of the most prestigious for early career faculty and we are proud of our faculty for being recognized in this capacity. Fostering researchers, like these award recipients, and the passion they have for their respective fields is one way Notre Dame continues to advance its mission as a distinguished and distinctive research institution, and we will continue to cultivate an environment that is committed to research, scholarship and creative endeavor.”

 

The full list of CAREER awardees, who come from the College of Engineering and the College of Science, is as follows:

  • Kyle James Bibby, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering and earth sciences, received the award for “Quantitative viral metagenomics for water quality assessment.” This research focuses on developing technical advancements to improve water quality monitoring and viral pathogen detection in other environments, including food. Bibby’s award was transferred to Notre Dame from the University of Pittsburgh.

  • John Parkhill, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry, was awarded a CAREER Award for “Self-consistent models of electronic dynamics and relaxation.” The aim of the project is to develop theories and computer software to model the motion of electrons in molecules that are stimulated by light and then potentially allow software users to predict important photodynamic properties of materials.

  • Jonathan K. Whitmer, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, received his CAREER Award for the project titled, “Targeting assembly in colloidal materials by tilting the free energy surface.” The goal of this research is to advance the fundamental understanding of self-assembly using colloidal materials and to develop dynamic control over the process of assembly. This project enhances a researcher’s ability to create designer molecules, particles, and processes for self-assembly into new materials which have advantageous mechanical, optical or electrical properties.

  • Yanliang Zhang, assistant professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering, received his CAREER Award for research called, “Printing and interface engineering of colloidal nanocrystals for flexible thermoelectrics and electronics.” The aim of this project is to develop new approaches to the use of nanocrystals in the formation of thermoelectric materials and devices, which has the potential to impact a broad range of applications in energy harvesting, cooling, and flexible electronics. Zhang’s award was transferred to Notre Dame from Boise State University.

In addition to the above four awards, 12 faculty from the Colleges of Arts and Letters, Engineering, and Science also received continuing CAREER Awards from past projects.

 

The CAREER program, which was established by the NSF in 1995, recognizes and supports outstanding early career faculty who exhibit a commitment to stimulating research while also providing educational opportunities for students. It is the NSF’s most prestigious award available to early career faculty. To learn about the University’s previous CAREER awardees, visit https://research.nd.edu/our-services/funding-opportunities/faculty/early-career-programs/nsf—-career-award/.

 

Contact: Brandi R. Klingerman, research communications specialist, Notre Dame Research, bklinger@nd.edu, 574-631-8183; @UNDResearch

Originally published by Brandi Klingerman at research.nd.edu on Dec. 10.

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Record number of Notre Dame students receive Gilman Scholarships to study abroad https://news.nd.edu/news/record-number-of-notre-dame-students-receive-gilman-scholarships-to-study-abroad/ news_94004 2018-12-07T15:00:00-0500 Colleen Wilcox The U.S. Department of State’s Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship has been awarded to five Notre Dame students who will be studying abroad in spring 2019.

Record number of Notre Dame students receive Gilman Scholarships to study abroad

Colleen Wilcox

The U.S. Department of State’s Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship has been awarded to five Notre Dame students who will be studying abroad in spring 2019. This is a record number of recipients for the University in a single application cycle.

Among the selected students:

• Junior Seth Cattanach of Minnesota will study in London. Cattanach is a computer engineering major.

• Junior Brendan O’Donnell of Illinois will study in Dublin-UCD. O’Donnell is a computer engineering major.

• Junior Avian Robinson of Wisconsin will study in Berlin. Robinson is a business analytics major.

• Junior Deandre Tomlinson of New Jersey will study in Puebla, Mexico. Tomlinson is a science computing major.

• Junior Meklit Zenabu of Ohio will study in Jerusalem. Zenabu is a psychology major.

More than 800 students were selected to receive scholarships to participate in credit-bearing study abroad programs and career-oriented internships around the world. More than 100 selection panelists from colleges and universities across the nation reviewed the 3,400 applications for this cycle.

Gilman Scholars receive up to $5,000 to apply toward their study abroad or internship program costs. The program offers grants for U.S. citizen undergraduate students of limited financial means to pursue academic studies or internships abroad, thereby gaining skills critical to our national security and economic competitiveness. The Benjamin A. Gilman Scholarship is a congressionally funded program of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. State Department and was named after the late congressman Benjamin A. Gilman, who served 30 years in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Applications for summer 2019 and fall 2019/academic year 2019-2020 programs will open in mid-January. Student applications are due March 5. Program information and a list of the recipients can be found on the program’s website

Originally published by Colleen Wilcox at studyabroad.nd.edu on Dec. 7.

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University of Notre Dame and Indiana Biosciences Research Institute partner to address health concerns https://news.nd.edu/news/university-of-notre-dame-and-indiana-biosciences-research-institute-partner-to-address-health-concerns/ news_93928 2018-12-05T13:00:00-0500 Brandi Klingerman The University of Notre Dame and the Indiana Biosciences Research Institute (IBRI) have signed a strategic alliance agreement to encourage collaborations between Notre Dame and IBRI researchers.

University of Notre Dame and Indiana Biosciences Research Institute partner to address health concerns

Brandi Klingerman

The University of Notre Dame and the Indiana Biosciences Research Institute (IBRI) have signed a strategic alliance agreement to encourage collaborations between Notre Dame and IBRI researchers. The alliance will enable both organizations to work together on research covering significant health issues in Indiana and around the world.

“We are very excited to have this new partnership with the IBRI in place,” said Robert J. Bernhard, vice president for research and professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering. “We believe that partnerships with organizations like the IBRI with significant ties to industry, universities, government and local communities will be an important pathway for research in the future, and we are pleased to be able to give Notre Dame faculty and students access to the IBRI resources and networks.” 

The alliance will allow researchers from each institution to share resources, including equipment and space, within each other’s facilities through new collaborations. Additionally, faculty of Notre Dame and employees of IBRI may receive joint or adjunct appointments within the partner institution as needed to support various projects.

“We are delighted to have this strategic alliance with the University of Notre Dame, one of the preeminent research universities in the world,” said Rainer Fischer, the IBRI’s chief executive officer and chief scientific and innovation officer. “This partnership enables the IBRI and Notre Dame to collaborate on research and technology licensing to boost Indiana’s economy and help patients around the world. It is another great example of why the IBRI was created to foster research collaboration between industry and academia.”

The IBRI is an independent, nonprofit applied research institute dedicated to translating scientific discovery into improved outcomes. Its goal is to build a world-class organization that works collaboratively with companies and universities on interrelated health issues to provide better results for patients.

In 2017, the IBRI opened a satellite location at Notre Dame’s Innovation Park in an effort to extend their relationship with the University’s faculty and students. To learn more about the IBRI, their partners and projects, visit https://www.indianabiosciences.org/

Contact: Brandi Klingerman, research communications specialist, Notre Dame Research, bklinger@nd.edu, 574-631-8183; @UNDResearch

Originally published by Brandi Klingerman at research.nd.edu on Dec. 5.

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Study: Tuberculosis survives by using host system against itself https://news.nd.edu/news/study-tuberculosis-survives-by-using-host-system-against-itself/ news_93929 2018-12-05T12:00:00-0500 Jessica Sieff In a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, scientists at the University of Notre Dame have discovered that the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) releases RNA into infected cells.

Study: Tuberculosis survives by using host system against itself

Jessica Sieff

In a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, scientists at the University of Notre Dame have discovered that the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) releases RNA into infected cells. This RNA stimulates the production of a compound known as interferon beta that appears to support the growth of the pathogen.

 

As part of the study the researchers found that mice lacking a key protein required for responding to foreign RNA and therefore required for interferon beta production were better able to control the MTB infection. The discovery was a surprise to the researchers, as interferon beta is essential to controlling several viral infections.

 

“The results suggest that our immune response to mycobacterial RNA is beneficial for the pathogen and bad for the host. It’s the total opposite of viral infections,” said Jeff Schorey, George B. Craig Jr. Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Notre Dame and co-author of the study. “This study gives us a better understanding of how the mycobacteria causes disease and what makes it the most successful pathogen in human history.”

 

MTB infections cause a battle between the immune response and the ability of the bacteria to circumvent that response — who wins the battle determines the body’s ability to control the infection. Schorey and Yong Cheng, a research assistant professor at Notre Dame, set out to determine how mycobacteria RNA could be affecting the host response. What they found was that by releasing RNA, the bacteria set off a chain reaction inside the macrophage, a cell type of the immune system — resulting in a mechanism that benefits the survival of MTB through the production of interferon beta.

 

While researchers have long known that bacteria produce proteins and other compounds to modulate an immune response, such a role for mycobacterial nucleic acids has only recently been defined. In viral infections, as opposed to bacterial infections, the virus releases its nucleic acids as it needs the machinery of the host cell to help make viral proteins and replicate its genome. In contrast, bacteria already have the machinery for these processes in place, suggesting the release of RNA into the host cell is intentional. The authors found that the MTB use its secretion system known as SecA2 to mediate RNA release from the mycobacteria.

 

“Bacteria have everything they need to make their proteins, so the fact that they were releasing nucleic acids was a surprise,” Schorey said. “These bugs are using this RNA-sensing pathway, which has evolved to promote antiviral activity — so in other words, the bacteria are manipulating our own immune system against us.”

 

MTB is the No. 1 cause of death by an infectious organism, and kills up to 1.8 million people each year. The World Health Organization estimates 200,000 of those deaths are children. Health officials lack an effective vaccine against pulmonary tuberculosis, and antibiotics used to treat the disease must be taken for six to nine months — a daunting regimen that challenges patient compliance. The disease is prevalent in parts of the world where health care systems lack infrastructure and funding.

 

Despite those challenges, Schorey, an affiliated faculty member at Notre Dame’s Eck Institute for Global Health, said the study’s results show potential for the development of immunotherapies to selectively stimulate protective immune responses as a treatment option for MTB and other bacterial infectious diseases. 

 

The study was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

 

Contact: Jessica Sieff, assistant director of media relations, 574-631-3933, jsieff@nd.edu

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Emergency financial assistance reduces homeless shelter entry and violent crime https://news.nd.edu/news/emergency-financial-assistance-reduces-homeless-shelter-entry-and-violent-crime/ news_93883 2018-12-04T15:00:00-0500 Colleen Sharkey A new study conducted by researchers at the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities (LEO) at the University of Notre Dame shows that emergency financial assistance for people facing homelessness not only reduces shelter entry, but also reduces criminal behavior.

Emergency financial assistance reduces homeless shelter entry and violent crime

Colleen Sharkey

A new study conducted by researchers at the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities (LEO) at the University of Notre Dame shows that emergency financial assistance for people facing homelessness not only reduces shelter entry, but also reduces criminal behavior.

Homelessness in the U.S. is a persistent and complex problem. Each year more than 2.3 million people experience homelessness, 7.4 million people live “doubled up” with friends or family for economic reasons, and many more are on the brink of homelessness.

Nearly every major U.S. city offers a hotline for people facing homelessness to request emergency financial assistance, and more than 15 million people call these hotlines every year. Linking call center information to arrest records from the Chicago Police Department, researchers found that total arrests of individuals declined between one and two years after a call for financial assistance in which they were successful in securing funds. For violent crime, fund recipients are 55 percent less likely to be arrested by police, with single individuals driving this decrease.

The decline in crime appears to be related, in part, to greater housing stability. Access to financial assistance significantly decreases arrests for homelessness-related outdoor crimes such as trespassing. However, the study also shows that financial assistance leads to an increase in property crime arrests. This increase is evident for family heads, but not single individuals. The increase is mostly due to shoplifting, and the timing of this increase suggests that financial assistance enables some families to take on financial obligations — such as apartment leases — that they are subsequently unable to meet.

James Sullivan, Gilbert F. Schaefer Professor of Economics at Notre Dame; David Phillips, associate research professor; and Caroline Palmer, a LEO research assistant, led the study of the Homelessness Prevention Call Center (HPCC) in Chicago. The HPCC, which is run by Catholic Charities Chicago, is one of the largest in the nation, taking an average of 70,000 calls per year.

The study, which will be published in the Journal of Public Economics, includes more than 8,500 individuals and families who called HPCC between 2010 and 2012. The researchers linked information from the call center to arrest records from the Chicago Police Department. Because availability of funding for the financial assistance offered by the HPCC varies, the researchers were able to look at the arrest rates of people seeking assistance when funding is available compared to those seeking assistance when no funding is available. The results indicate that policymakers should consider emergency financial assistance as an effective, evidence-based approach for preventing not only homelessness but also crime.

“We are finding that stabilizing one person in the midst of major financial crisis can benefit society as a whole,” Phillips said. “Simply paying someone’s rent for a month until the crisis passes helps not only that person avoid the shelter, but also benefits other people who might otherwise be affected if that person’s unstable situation leads to violence.”

This study, funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, builds on previous research on the HPCC by Sullivan and William Evans, Keough-Hesburgh Professor of Economics at Notre Dame. Sullivan and Evans’ study was published in Science in 2016 and was the first to show that emergency financial aid significantly reduces homelessness. 

Contact: Colleen Sharkey, assistant director of media relations, 574-631-9958, csharke2@nd.edu

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Notre Dame Stories: Star of wonder https://news.nd.edu/news/notre-dame-stories-star-of-wonder/ news_93876 2018-12-04T11:00:00-0500 Andy Fuller In this episode: Star of wonder. The Gospel account of St. Matthew includes a peculiar episode: Magi or wise men who followed a star to the place of Jesus’ birth. A Notre Dame astrophysicist details the astronomical phenomenon he believes led them to Bethlehem.…

Notre Dame Stories: Star of wonder

Andy Fuller

In this episode: Star of wonder.

The Gospel account of St. Matthew includes a peculiar episode: Magi or wise men who followed a star to the place of Jesus’ birth. A Notre Dame astrophysicist details the astronomical phenomenon he believes led them to Bethlehem.

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Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and celebrated speechwriter Peggy Noonan to serve as Notre Dame’s 2019 commencement speaker https://news.nd.edu/news/reagan-speechwriter-wall-street-journal-columnist-peggy-noonan-to-serve-as-notre-dames-2019-commencement-speaker/ news_93783 2018-12-03T08:00:00-0500 Dennis Brown Peggy Noonan — Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Wall Street Journal, speechwriter for President Ronald Reagan and author of five New York Times best-sellers — will deliver the principal address and receive an honorary degree at the University of Notre Dame’s 174th commencement ceremony May 19.

Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and celebrated speechwriter Peggy Noonan to serve as Notre Dame’s 2019 commencement speaker

Dennis Brown

Peggy Noonan — Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Wall Street Journal, speechwriter for President Ronald Reagan and author of five New York Times best-sellers — will deliver the principal address and receive an honorary degree at the University of Notre Dame’s 174th commencement ceremony May 19.

 

“Peggy Noonan is universally admired for the stirring prose, keen insight and the moral perspective of her commentary on America and the world,” said University President Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C. “I look forward to welcoming her to Notre Dame and hearing her address to our graduates.”

 

After working at CBS News’ radio division following her graduation from Fairleigh Dickinson University, Noonan joined the Reagan White House in 1984 as a speechwriter. She worked with Reagan on several of his most famous speeches, including the “Boys of Pointe du Hoc,” delivered on the 40th anniversary of D-Day, and his address to the nation following the 1986 Challenger space shuttle explosion, in which she drew upon poet John Magee’s words about aviators who “slipped the surly bonds of earth … and touched the face of God.” The latter was ranked among the top 10 political speeches of the 20th century, and “Pointe du Hoc” is considered one of the century’s top 60 speeches of any kind.

 

​During Vice President George H.W. Bush’s 1988 run for the presidency, Noonan worked with him on his acceptance speech, in which he spoke of “a kinder, gentler nation” and “a thousand points of light.”

 

​Noonan also worked in a fictional White House as a consultant on NBC’s television drama “The West Wing.”

 

​Since 2000, Noonan has written a political column titled “Declarations,” which is published weekly in the weekend Wall Street Journal. She was awarded the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary for “rising to the moment with beautifully rendered columns that connected readers to the shared virtues of Americans during one of the nation’s most divisive political campaigns.”

 

She is the author of nine books on American politics, history and culture and is one of 10 historians and writers who contributed essays on the American presidency for the book “Character Above All.”

 

​Early in her career, Noonan was an adjunct professor of journalism at New York University, and she has served as a fellow at Harvard University’s Institute of Politics and an instructor of history at Yale University.

 

​The 2019 University Commencement Ceremony will be held in Notre Dame Stadium.

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Notre Dame’s Sofia Carozza, Katie Gallagher named 2019 Marshall Scholars https://news.nd.edu/news/notre-dames-sofia-carozza-katie-gallagher-named-2019-marshall-scholars/ news_93747 2018-12-03T07:00:00-0500 Erin Blasko They are the University’s eighth and ninth Marshall Scholars overall and two of 10 Notre Dame students awarded one of the prestigious open-discipline British scholarships — Rhodes, Marshall, Mitchell and Gates Cambridge — since 2013.

Notre Dame’s Sofia Carozza, Katie Gallagher named 2019 Marshall Scholars

Erin Blasko

University of Notre Dame seniors Sofia Carozza and Katie Gallagher have been named 2019 Marshall Scholars. Carozza, of South Bend, Indiana, will study neuroscience at the University of Cambridge. Gallagher, of Naperville, Illinois, will study math at the University of Oxford. They are the University’s eighth and ninth Marshall Scholars overall and two of 10 Notre Dame students awarded one of the prestigious open-discipline British scholarships — Rhodes, Marshall, Mitchell and Gates Cambridge — since 2013.

“Sofia Carozza and Katie Gallagher epitomize the commitment to scholarship and social engagement that Notre Dame reveres," said University president Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C. “None is more deserving of this high recognition than Sofia and Katie. Congratulations to them, to their professors and the Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE) staff who supported them.”

“We are so happy to congratulate Katie and Sofia on their selection as 2019 Marshall Scholars. They are extraordinary individuals who exemplify both the Marshall Scholarship criteria of ‘academic merit, leadership potential and ambassadorial potential’ and the Marshall Scholar characteristics of ‘talented, independent and wide-ranging,’” said Jeffrey Thibert, Paul and Maureen Stefanick Director of CUSE at Notre Dame. “They will truly both use their platforms as Marshall Scholars to enrich the world, and we thank all the members of the Notre Dame community who have played a role in their academic, professional and personal development.”

CUSE promotes the intellectual development of Notre Dame undergraduates through scholarly engagement, research, creative endeavors and the pursuit of fellowships and assisted Carozza and Gallagher with the application process.

Named for former U.S. Secretary of State George C. Marshall, the Marshall Scholarships support Americans of high ability to study at graduate level at a U.K. institution in any area of study, covering university fees, cost of living, research and thesis grants and travel to and from the U.S., among other expenses.

Carozza is a neuroscience and behavior major in the College of Science with a supplemental major in theology and a minor in philosophy, politics and economics in the College of Arts and Letters. She is a Hesburgh-Yusko Scholar, a Glynn Family Honors Scholar and a Center for Ethics and Culture Sorin Fellow.

On campus, Carozza is a past research assistant at the Institute for Advanced Study and a current research assistant in the Development and Psychopathology Laboratory, where she is conducting her senior thesis on intergenerational trauma and maternal maltreatment. Beyond that, she has been involved with ND Students for Worker Justice, Show Some Skin and the Women’s Boxing Club, and she shaved her head for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation through “The Bald and the Beautiful.”

Off campus, Carozza is a mental health coach for at-risk youth and leads an exercise program for youths at the St. Joseph County Juvenile Justice Center. She spent the summer after her freshman year tutoring children with developmental disabilities and psychiatric disorders in Paraguay as an Experiencing the World Fellow with the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at Notre Dame; the summer after her sophomore year conducting neuroscience research at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health, as an Amgen Scholar; and the summer after her junior year translating the science of toxic stress into policy initiatives, educational materials and community-based change at the ChildWise Institute in Montana.

Further afield, Carozza studied theology in Jerusalem and has taken short trips to El Salvador, Bolivia and Spain. She is fluent in Italian and conversational in Spanish, and she is a classically trained harpist.

Carozza plans to pursue a master of philosophy in basic and translational neuroscience leading into a doctorate in psychiatry at Cambridge. Ultimately, she hopes to establish a nonprofit foundation dedicated to translating neuroscience into child well-being.

“I am grateful and humbled to be named a Marshall Scholar. I’ve been blessed with an incredible formation in this campus community, and I’m deeply indebted to my amazing mentors in the faculty and staff of Notre Dame, without whom this would not have been possible,” Carozza said. “I’m excited about the opportunity to study at Cambridge, where I can continue to advance Notre Dame’s mission to be a force for good in the world ‘as learning becomes service to justice.’”

Nancy Michael, director of undergraduate studies, neuroscience and behavior at Notre Dame and Carozza’s academic adviser, said of Carozza, “Sofia is a rising star and I am certain she will contribute great things not only to the immediate fields of philosophy, psychology and neuroscience, but also to our society as a whole.”

Gallagher is an honors math and music major in the College of Arts and Letters. She is a CUSE Sorin Scholar, a 2018 Goldwater Scholar and co-founder and co-president of the Notre Dame Women in Math Group. Gallagher previously studied at Oxford during the 2017-18 academic year as part of Notre Dame International’s Oxford program, where she was a member of the Mirzakhani Society for women in math, named for the first female mathematician to win the Fields Medal. As a high school student, she was mentored by David Schmitz, a 1990 Notre Dame graduate in honors math and a professor of mathematics, math and actuarial science at North Central College in Illinois.

Musically, Gallagher has served as concertmaster and principal viola for the Notre Dame Symphony Orchestra, and she is a sectional coach for the South Bend Youth Symphony Orchestra. Gallagher also served as principal viola for the Oxford University Orchestra during her time there. As a sophomore, she shared top honors in the Notre Dame Symphony Orchestra’s Concerto Competition, leading directly to two solo performances with the orchestra.

Gallagher plans to pursue a master of science in mathematics and a master of science in mathematics and foundations of computer science at Oxford. She also plans to perform with the Oxford University Music Society. Beyond that, Gallagher plans to pursue a doctorate in mathematics, conduct research in number theory and eventually teach at the university level. She hopes to mentor young women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) as well.

“I am thankful to Dr. Jeffrey Thibert and the rest of the CUSE staff who guided me through my application process. I am also thankful to my professors, family and friends who have supported me throughout this process and throughout my Notre Dame career,” Gallagher said. “In particular, I’d like to thank professor Frank Connolly (professor emeritus of mathematics at Notre Dame) who has been an effective mentor during my entire time at Notre Dame. His enthusiasm for mathematics inspired me to learn and tackle difficult problems in the field. I am also grateful for the guidance and opportunities provided to me by the music department and especially the guidance of Dr. Peter Smith. The combination of math and music at Notre Dame has made my experience rewarding and special."

Jeffrey Diller, chair of the Department of Mathematics at Notre Dame, said of Gallagher, “Katie Gallagher is as talented and accomplished as any math student I have seen in my 20 years at Notre Dame. She has demonstrated her capacity for hard work, for learning, for independent research and for leadership. I believe she will succeed in even the very best graduate programs in mathematics and go on to a stellar future as a teacher, researcher and leader.”

Founded in 1954, the Marshall Scholarships commemorate the ideals of the Marshall Plan — an American-led effort to rebuild the economies of Western Europe after World War II — and express the continuing gratitude of the British people to their American counterparts.

For more information on this and other fellowship opportunities, visit cuse.nd.edu.

Contact: Erin Blasko, assistant director of media relations, 574-631-4127, eblasko@nd.edu

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