Notre Dame News http://news.nd.edu/ Notre Dame News gathers and disseminates information that enhances understanding of the University’s academic and research mission and its accomplishments as a Catholic institute of higher learning. en-us 2017-08-18T23:54:55+0000 Sculpture park opening set for Aug. 25 https://news.nd.edu/news/reclaiming-our-nature/ news_78872 2017-08-18T16:00:00-0400 Notre Dame News Celebrate with the Friends of the Snite Museum of Art as we "Reclaim Our Nature" at the Charles B. Hayes Family Sculpture Park at 6 p.m. Aug. 25 (Friday). 

Sculpture park opening set for Aug. 25

Notre Dame News

Celebrate with the Friends of the Snite Museum of Art as we "Reclaim Our Nature" at the Charles B. Hayes Family Sculpture Park at 6 p.m. Aug. 25 (Friday). The first 100 guests can plant little bluestem grass plugs into the new gardens and receive souvenir T-shirts.

Ice cream and frozen treat carts will be provided by the Friends of the Snite Museum of Art and VisitSouth Bend.com. Sarah Longenecker, county conservationist for the St. Joseph County Soil and Water Conservation District, will give an informal talk at 6:30 p.m.   

This celebration is sponsored by the Friends of the Snite Museum of Art, VisitSouthBend.com, and South Bend Venues Parks and Arts. More information is available at sniteartmuseum.nd.edu.

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August and September Service Anniversaries https://news.nd.edu/news/august-and-september-service-anniversaries/ news_78879 2017-08-18T14:15:00-0400 Carol Bradley 50 Years Cornelius F. Delaney, Philosophy   45 Years James L. Wittenbach, Accountancy   40 Years Cheryl L. Copley, Chemistry and Biochemistry Julia F. Knight, Mathematics William F. McKinney, Accounting Operations David N. Ricchiute, Accountancy Kenneth F. Ripple, Law School John H. Van Engen, History Shirley M. Wise, Bookstore…

August and September Service Anniversaries

Carol Bradley

50 Years

Cornelius F. Delaney,

Philosophy

 

45 Years

James L. Wittenbach,

Accountancy

 

40 Years

Cheryl L. Copley, Chemistry

and Biochemistry

Julia F. Knight, Mathematics

William F. McKinney,

Accounting Operations

David N. Ricchiute,

Accountancy

Kenneth F. Ripple, Law

School

John H. Van Engen, History

Shirley M. Wise, Bookstore

 

35 Years

Deborah A. Bang, Freimann

Animal Care Facility

David M. Betson, Economics

and Policy Studies

Michael C. Brownstein, East

Asian Languages and Cultures

Noreen Deane-Moran, English

JoAnn DellaNeva and

Maria R. Olivera-Williams,

Romance Languages and

Literatures

Thomas P. Flint, Philosophy

Nasir Ghiaseddin, Analytics

and Operations IT

Richard L. Gray, Art,

ArtHistory and Design

Eugene W. Halton, Sociology

Cynthia L. Hansen,

Service Center

Yih-Fang Huang, Electrical

Engineering

Suzanne Kowalski,

Shared Services

Eric L. Kuehner, Alexander

G. Lappin, Patricia G.

Laskowski and Anthony S.

Serianni, Chemistry and

Biochemistry

Wanda L. Marshall,

South Dining Hall

Clark Power, Program of

Liberal Studies

David F. Ruccio and

Jennifer L. Warlick, College of

Arts and Letters

Steven A. Srmek,

Rolfs Aquatic Center

Ting-Kin David Yeh,

Mendoza IT

 

30 Years

Sunny K. Boyd,

Biological Sciences

Steven A. Buechler, Applied

Computational Mathematics

and Statistics

Hsueh-Chia Chang, Chemical

and Biomolecular Engineering

Melissa L. Conboy, Athletics

Facilities and Sports Operations

Lisa M. Cunningham,

South Dining Hall

Deborah L. Fowler,

Custodial Services

Margaret L. Giles and Karen

F. Lanser, Hesburgh Libraries

David S. Hachen, Sociology

Brenda K. Jones, Shared

Services

Joshua B. Kaplan,

Political Science

Barbara C. Page, Security

Lisa K. Phillips, Risk

Management and Safety

Lori M. Rush, Development

Mei-Chi Shaw, Mathematics

Richard G. Sheehan, Finance

Stephen N. Smorin,

Mail Distribution

Cynthia L. Sykes, Athletics

Compliance and Legal

Jerry C. Wei, Analytics and

Operations IT

 

 

25 Years

Debra D. Acrey, Student

Organizations

Aaron B. Bales and Thurston D.

Miller, Hesburgh Libraries

Gail Bederman, History

Julia M. Braungart-Rieker,

Psychology

Jay B. Brockman,

College of Engineering

Sean R. Bryant, Landscape

Services

Kathleen A. Carr,

South Dining Hall

Danny Z. Chen, Computer

Science and Engineering

Edward J. Conlon, Management

and Organization

John H. Engel, Research and

Sponsored Programs Accounting

Annette L. Feirrell, Campus

Dining — Corby House

Daniel A. Handley,

Custodial Services

Michael L. Hemler, Finance

Bradley J. Malkovsky, Theology

A. James McAdams,

Political Science

Rosanne Molenda, Financial Aid

G. Felicitas Munzel, Program of

Liberal Studies

Thomas J. Nevala,

Athletic Business Office

Hugh R. Page and Anita M.

Stratton, First Year of Studies

Susan G. Sheridan, Anthropology

Kathleen K. Speybroeck,

Equipment Room

 

20 Years

Nora J. Besansky, Frank H.

Collins, Kristin M. Lewis,

Jeanne Romero-Severson and

David W. Severson, Biological

Sciences

Peter C. Burns, Civil and

Environmental Engineering and

Earth Sciences

John E. Conley and Paul F.

Doyle, Residence Halls Staff

Michael E. Connors and

Maxwell E. Johnson, Theology

Monica A. Cundiff, Joyce Center

Administration

Andrew B. Deliyannides and

Stuart Greene, English

Trang K. DoHoang, Betty L.

Wildrick, Angela M. Williams

and Dawn A. Young,

Custodial Services

Patrick J. Fay,

Electrical Engineering

James K. Foster,

Preprofessional Studies

Mary E. Frandsen, Music

Matthew E. Fulcher and Dayle

Seidenspinner-Nunez, College of

Arts and Letters

Robin R. Hoeppner,

First Year of Studies

Patrick G. Holmes, Academic

Services for Student-Athletes

Thomas M. Kellenberg,

Washington, D.C.

Scott J. Kirner, Bart D. Loeb

and Michael S. Rafferty, Campus

Technology Services

Maureen M. Lakin and Jean C.

McManus, Hesburgh Libraries

Brian T. Lohr, Admissions

Julia J. Marvin, Program of

Liberal Studies

Tadeusz R. Mazurek, Classics

James J. McKenna, Anthropology

Janine E. Meersman, Associate

VP Undergraduate Enrollment

Arenda J. Murray, South

Dining Hall

Karen E. Richman,

Institute for Latino Studies

Karen P. Schneider Kirner,

Campus Ministry

David A. Smith, Psychology

Sergei Starchenko, Mathematics

Bernardine L. Stein, Customer

IT Solutions

Robert E. Sullivan, History

Anthony F. Sutton,

Sports Medicine

Lana M. Taylor, Office of

Campus Safety

Diannah R. Thibault,

St. Michael’s Laundry

Troy L. Tucker, General Services

Kathleen F. Werner, Romance

Languages and Literatures

Christina K. Wolbrecht,

Political Science

 

15 Years

John A. Blacklow, Music

David E. Campbell,

Political Science

Myra S. Chamblee,

Shared Services

Kay Ernsberger,

Preprofessional Studies

Marcia M. Erp,

South Dining Hall

Robert Fox and Patricia L.

O’Rourke, Hesburgh Libraries

Agustin Fuentes, Anthropology

Peter D. Holland, Film,

Television and Theatre

Romana C. Huk, English

Joyce Jodway, Huddle

Jessica N. Kayongo,

Hesburgh Libraries

Mark Kocovski,

Human Resources

J. Nicholas Laneman,

Electrical Engineering

Sara C. Liebscher, Development

Xinyu Liu, Physics

Carey Lohraff, Au Bon Pain

Nelson Mark and James X.

Sullivan, Economics

David T. Mayernik,

School of Architecture

Sarah E. McKibben, Irish

Language and Literature

Rory M. McVeigh, Sociology

Justin Moody, North Dining Hall

Scott C. Morris and Nancy

L. O’Connor, Aerospace and

Mechanical Engineering

Lucille A. Nate, Law School

Joshua J. Noem,

Alumni Association

Margaret R. Pfeil, Theology

Christina Ries, Institute for

Scholarship in the Liberal Arts

Holly Rivers, Kellogg Institute for

International Studies

Leigh A. Roberts, Payroll Services

Michael A. Roberts,

Radiation Laboratory

Innocent Rungenga, Morris Inn

Douglas A. Shoue,

Biological Sciences

Mark B. Thesing, Mendoza

College of Business

David Thornton, Library Law

Kara L. Turner, Registrar

Sau-Thi Vo, South Dining Hall

Nisa Wagner, St. Michael's

Laundry

 

10 Years

Eishau S. Allen, Eric B. Amos,

Sherry Q. Johnson and

Christia L. Wolf, North

Dining Hall

Guadalupe Alvarez, Melissa

Clingaman and Canary

Wright, Custodial Services

Corey M. Angst, IT, Analytics

and Operations

Brandon L. Ashfeld,

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Ann W. Astell, Theology

Brad A. Badertscher, Jeffrey J.

Burks, James L. Fuehrmeyer

and Brian R. Levey,

Accountancy

Zygmunt G. Baranski, Vanesa

A. Miseres, Marisel C.

Moreno, Sandra M. Teixeira

and Juan M. Vitulli, Romance

Languages and Literatures

Mary A. Beck,      

Student Affairs

Adam L. Beltran, Track and

Cross Country

Tracy C. Bergstrom,

Hesburgh Libraries

Robert J. Bernhard,

Office of VP Research

Constance M. Biegel,

Radiation Laboratory

Tobias Boes, German and

Russian Languages and

Literature

Paul R. Brenner, Center for

Research Computing

Lorraine Brown, Campus

Dining — Holy Cross House

Megan G. Brown, University

Counseling Center

Arnel A. Bulaoro,

Multicultural Student Programs

and Services

Mark A. Caprio and Antonio

Delgado, Physics

Roberto R. Casarez, Auxiliary

Operations

Timothy J. Cichos, Teaching

and Learning Technologies

Katherine M. Cinninger,

Development-Organizational

Effectiveness

Lori A. Crawford-Dixon and

Clare D. Roach, Alliance for

Catholic Education

Richard A. Cross, Philosophy

Darren W. Davis and Susan

H. Rosato, Political Science

Erika Doss, American Studies

Rose M. Dvorak, Security

Scott Emrich, Computer

Science and Engineering

William N. Evans and

Michael J. Pries, Economics

David Galvin and Karsten

Grove, Mathematics

Pengjie Gao, Finance

Donald Grandison, Eck

Tennis Pavilion

Karen Graubart and Rory

Rapple, History

Ronald W. Grisoli,

Washington Hall

Chad E. Grotegut, Academic

Services for Student-Athletes

Marie D. Halvorsen

Ganepola, Management and

Organization

Barbara K. Henning, Campus

Dining — Corby House

Bradley M. Horner, Center for

Culinary Excellence

Judy L. Hutchinson, London

Undergraduate Program

Joseph A. Jeffo, Army Science

Brian J. Kirzeder, Accounting

and Financial Services

Teesha M. LaVine, Mail

Distribution

Jennifer C. Lindzy,

University Catering

Susannah B. Monta, English

Dale M. Nees, Mendoza

College of Business

Rebecca G. Overmyer,

Sociology

Charu C. Pant,

South Dining Hall

William J. Pedersen, Joyce

Center Technical Services

Jonie L. Phillipi, Morris Inn

Stephanie Pries,

Investment Office

Ronald W. Rose,

Customer IT Solutions

Robert A. Schulz, Tsuyoshi

Tokusumi and Yumiko

Tokusumi, Biological Sciences

Joshua Shrout, Civil and

Environmental Engineering

and Earth Sciences

Andrea L. Swanagan,

Office of Strategic Planning

Michelle Thornton,

Anthropology

Paul W. Turner, Teaching and

Learning Technologies

Janice Wade,

St. Michael’s Laundry

Michael A. Zenk,

Office of Research

Xuying Zhao, Management

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June new employees https://news.nd.edu/news/june-new-employees-3/ news_78885 2017-08-18T12:00:00-0400 Carol Bradley Brook-Lin Acker, Tiffany A. Batson, Trayvon C. Calhoun, Annice R. Carter, Jeffrey D. Elowsky, Sara L. Ernsperger, Skylar A. Gunn, Porscha T. Hill, Ryan A. Konrath, Nathan A. Pharris, Tyler D. Rouse, Iredell Sanders, Rosemary Stuckey, Anthony B. Weston and Alexis I. Williams, Custodial Services Sara N. Agostinelli,…

June new employees

Carol Bradley

Brook-Lin Acker, Tiffany A. Batson, Trayvon C. Calhoun, Annice R. Carter, Jeffrey D. Elowsky, Sara L. Ernsperger, Skylar A. Gunn, Porscha T. Hill, Ryan A. Konrath, Nathan A. Pharris, Tyler D. Rouse, Iredell Sanders, Rosemary Stuckey, Anthony B. Weston and Alexis I. Williams, Custodial Services

Sara N. Agostinelli, Gender Relations Center

Ryan L. Angel, Office of Research

Stephen C. Barany, Institute for Church Life

Adam M. Callender, Joyce Center Technical Services

Andrew J. Chilafoe and Rebecca L. Ryan, Naval Science

Corey D. Cole, Fire Protection

Mariah L. Cressy, Emily M. Schmid and Sarah J. Yaklic, Office of VP for Mission Engagement

Juan S. Deleon, Joel M. Gibbs, David P. Godollei and Timothy O. Perkins, Maintenance

Cody A. Denman, Elysia M. Jimenez, Joseph H. Littell, Deborah S. Lyon, Tyler R. Newsome and Kelsey E. Rankel, Morris Inn

Todd D. Dion, Recreational Sports

Walker C. Embrey, Naval Science

Kevin P. Fitzsimmons, Bridgette M. McDermott, Kathryn E. Moran, Maria C. Murphy, Nicole A. Raftery, Carmen C. Rivera, and Michael R. Zelenka, Alliance for Catholic Education

Tracy L. Fronk, Customer IT Solutions

Karyn J. Galloway, Athletics Digital Media

Melissa R. Jackson, Marketing Communications

Rchard G. Jones, American Studies

Kyle A. Kelly and Michael B. Szemborski, Varsity Strength and Conditioning

Nam Yoon Kim, Psychology

Sarah Kroeger, Department of Economics

Erin S. Lavin, Institute for Educational Initiatives

Constanza A. Lengerich Ulloa, VP and Associate Provost for Innovation

Agnieszka Marczak Czajka, Center for Research Computing

Stephen Q. Nekic, Patricia A. Kokesh and Lavarr D. Barnett, Development

Alice A. Obermiller, GBP Student Services

Taylor L. Poulin, Snite Museum

Andrea M. Ringer, Lab for Economic Opportunities

Guieswende H. Rouamba, Center for the Study of Language and Culture

Elizabeth E. Rudt, Flatley Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement

Rebecca Ruvalcaba, Campus Ministry

Mark C. Schult, User Services

Terrence M. Shaw, Office of Community Standards

Ryan T. Spurr, Office of Campus Safety

David J. Stabrawa, Fencing

Katherine E. Warner, Center for Social Concerns

Rebecca A. Williams, Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace

Katherine A. Wynne, Office of Associate VP-Student Services

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July 2017 service anniversaries https://news.nd.edu/news/july-2017-service-anniversaries/ news_78882 2017-08-18T11:00:00-0400 Melissa Jackson The University congratulates those employees celebrating significant service anniversaries in July:   40 Years Janet L. Million, Air Science   35 Years Juli A. Tate, Department of Economics   30 Years Robert E. Bayliss, Men’s Basketball Paul V. Costello, University Catering Margaret Dobrowolska Furdyna, Physics Daniel E. Kavanaugh…

July 2017 service anniversaries

Melissa Jackson

The University congratulates those employees celebrating significant service anniversaries in July:

 

40 Years

Janet L. Million, Air Science

 

35 Years

Juli A. Tate, Department of Economics

 

30 Years

Robert E. Bayliss, Men’s Basketball

Paul V. Costello, University Catering

Margaret Dobrowolska Furdyna, Physics

Daniel E. Kavanaugh and Gregory C. Pavnica, Security

Eileen A. Miller, Procurement Services

James M. Moriarty, Athletics Medical

Milind Saraph, Campus Technology Services

Diane C. Sikorski, Hesburgh Libraries

 

Apologies to three 30-year employees inadvertently omitted from the May anniversaries:

 

Debra K. Fox, Library Law

Vicki M. Mack, Freimann Animal Care Facility

John R. Zack, Basilica of the Sacred Heart

 

25 Years

Gina Costa, Snite Museum

Andrew S. Durrenberger, Maintenance

Chao-Shin Liu and H. Fred Mittelstaedt, MCOB Accountancy

Rhonda S. Singleton, Psychology

Johanes Suhardjo, Engineering and Science Computing

 

20 Years

Patricia P. Base, Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts

Donald K. Burns, Utilities Operations

Judith L. Fox, Clinical Law Center

Mandy L. Havert, Hesburgh Libraries

Don A. Howard, Philosophy

Dana R. Marsh, Executive Education

John T. McGreevy, College of Arts and Letters

Denise Murphy, Human Resources

 

15 Years

Amy C. Barrett, Law School

Edward J. Caron, Alliance for Catholic Education

Kelly L. Culver, Satellite Theological Education Program

Vanessa A. Easterday, North Dining Hall

Laura B. Flynn and Jean C. James, First Year of Studies

Thomas J. Guinan, Office of the Provost

Shari K. Hill Sweet, Graduate School

Mary L. Olen, Campus Ministry

Beth C. Padgett, Customer IT Solutions

Ann P. Strasser, Research and Sponsored Programs Accounting

Cleo K. Thanos, Executive Education

Gayle M. Washburn, Institute for Educational Initiatives

 

10 Years

Rashna Balsara, Keck Center for Transgene Research

Joshua G. Baltazar and Paula Worhatch, Off-Campus Programs

Cheryl A. Bauer, Campus Dining 

Mark C. Beudert, Music

Vanmom Chiv, Reckers

Ann-Marie Conrado, Art, Art History and Design

Brian M. Green, Development

Carol A. Kulcsar, Custodial Services

Nicole R. MacLaughlin,University Writing Program

Karen K. Manier, Center for Social Concerns

Amanda J. Mast, Teaching and Learning Technologies

Eric S. McCartney, Law School Information Technology

Leslie L. Morgan, Hesburgh Libraries

Alexander S. Mukasyan and Satyajyoti Senapati, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Joseph A. Muszynski, South Dining Hall

Alex J. Nash, Huddle

Darin J. Ottaviani, Athletics Marketing

John E. Pride, Custodial Services

Erik Runyon, Marketing Communications

Scott R. Stansbury, Sports Medicine

 

 

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Researchers discover new chemical process that could reduce nitrogen oxides from diesel exhaust https://news.nd.edu/news/researchers-discover-new-chemical-process-that-could-reduce-nitrogen-oxides-from-diesel-exhaust/ news_78763 2017-08-18T08:00:00-0400 Jessica Sieff The study, published in the journal Science, is the culmination of a decade of collaborative research by the University of Notre Dame, Purdue University and Cummins Inc., funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy, according to William Schneider, co-author of the study.  

Researchers discover new chemical process that could reduce nitrogen oxides from diesel exhaust

Jessica Sieff

Chemical engineers at the University of Notre Dame have discovered a catalytic process that could help curb emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from diesel-powered vehicles, a priority air pollutant that is a key ingredient in smog.

Current emission regulations and control systems for diesel engines have reduced pollution at high temperatures. While motorists around the world wait for their vehicles to warm up, a majority of NOx emissions – between 70 and 80 percent – take place during transient and cold-start conditions, impairing air quality.

The study, published in the journal Science, is the culmination of a decade of collaborative research by the University of Notre Dame, Purdue University and Cummins Inc., funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy, according to William Schneider, co-author of the study.  

“Diesel engines power virtually all heavy-duty trucks, and NOx emissions control remains one of the key challenges facing manufacturers and operators,” said Schneider, H. Clifford and Evelyn A. Brosey Professor of Engineering in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Notre Dame.

Schneider led the Notre Dame team and focused on copper-exchanged zeolites, a particular class of catalysts used to promote the conversion of NOx into environmentally benign nitrogen gas. These catalysts “light off,” or begin functioning, at temperatures too high to capture a large fraction of the NOx produced. The researchers discovered the key chemical step that limits the performance of these catalysts at low temperature.

“We knew that copper ions trapped in the zeolite pores were responsible for the catalytic reaction, but we did not know what caused the chemical reaction to slow to such an extent at lower temperatures,” Schneider said. The team developed sophisticated computer models, performed on supercomputers at Notre Dame’s Center for Research Computing and the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, to track the movement of the copper ions within the zeolite pores. They discovered that the ions were much more mobile than anyone had appreciated, so much so that they were able to swim through the zeolite pores and pair up. 

“We hypothesized that this pairing was key to the low-temperature performance,” said Schneider. Experiments performed by the Purdue team at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory proved that this pairing was indeed happening during one step in the overall catalytic process. The team was able to combine the experiments and computations to quantify the pairing and its influence on NOx removal.

“This is a goal that the catalysis community has been striving toward for many years,” said Schneider. “This information paves the way to developing catalysts that outperform current formations at lower temperatures, allowing diesel engines to meet stringent emissions regulations. Further, we think we can take advantage of the pairing process for other catalytic reactions beyond NOx removal.”

Co-authors of the study, include Christopher Paolucci, Sichi Li and Hui Li at Notre Dame; Rajamani Gounder, Ishant Khurana, Atish A. Parekh, Arthur J. Shih, John R. Di Iorio, Johnatan D. Albarracin-Caballero, Jeffrey T. Miller, W. Nicholas Delgass and Fabio H. Ribeiro at Purdue University; and Aleksey Yezerets with Cummins Inc., which designs and manufactures diesel and alternative-fuel engines.

 

Contact: Jessica Sieff, Office of Media Relations, 574-631-3933, jsieff@nd.edu

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New construction and Notre Dame Stadium renovations impact community https://news.nd.edu/news/new-construction-and-notre-dame-stadium-renovations-impact-community/ news_78848 2017-08-17T12:00:00-0400 Marissa Gebhard Local nonprofit organizations have gained approximately $1.68 million over the past five years for their work at concession stands during football games at Notre Dame Stadium.      

New construction and Notre Dame Stadium renovations impact community

Marissa Gebhard

In addition to having a tremendous impact on the University of Notre Dame’s teaching, research, athletics and student life, the University’s largest construction project will also benefit the community in many ways. Community members will have an increased opportunity to earn revenue for nonprofit organizations, participate in psychology research, reap the benefits of having national and regional events in their hometown and benefit from new tiered ticket pricing.

Local nonprofit organizations have gained approximately $1.68 million over the past five years for their work at concession stands during football games at Notre Dame Stadium. Led by Levy, which manages concessions for the University, between 650 and 700 volunteers worked at concession stands at the stadium last year. About 40 nonprofit groups, including churches, local athletic teams and school groups, will participate this year.

Northridge High School’s Science Olympiad team used to bend and cut aluminum to create robots for their robotics competitions. Now they create their own robots with 3-D printers they purchased with funds they earned volunteering at concession stands at Notre Dame Stadium. “Prior to this, it was hard for us to function. This opportunity has meant a lot to this organization,” says Jeremy Gerber, Northridge’s Science Olympiad coach. He estimates the team has made more than $20,000 over the last three years. “We’ve been able to offer the kids way more equipment and way more experiences.” The 3-D printers have allowed the group of about 55 high school and middle school students to explore new design techniques and hone their projects.

Concession stand revenue

The money earned through working concessions will send the Ancilla College women’s soccer team to North Carolina this fall to prepare for the season. Head coach Justin Crew says the trip will allow team members to form strong bonds before heading into competition. “They’ll live together for a week and do workouts together,” Crew says. “They will build a family culture and a bond.” The trip is possible because of the nearly $7,000 the team raised through working concession stands at some football, basketball and hockey games. Bethel College’s softball team used its share of concession profits for a similar trip; the team started their season in Arizona. Ancilla’s cheerleading team also earned about $7,000, which they used to pay for a trip to the national championship competition.

On Notre Dame home football game days, local groups can also raise money for their organizations by volunteering with Monterrey Security to serve in guest service roles. Recently, church youth groups and local school athletic teams have raised funds for uniforms and special trips. Groups also have the potential to earn bonuses from Monterrey.

When Notre Dame’s Department of Psychology moves into O’Neill Hall in 2018 and brings all associated laboratories together in one building, the community will be able to participate in research more conveniently as parking will be more accessible. Current research investigations address health, well-being, aging and stress, and participants receive modest stipends for their involvement in the research.

With an increase in the number new venues on campus, the community will also benefit as new visitors come to conferences, meetings and special events that the local area was not able to host previously. VenueND, a team of sales, reservation and event specialists, will utilize spaces across campus as well as premium event space in the Duncan Student Center, O'Neill Hall and Corbett Family Hall to host national and regional conferences, weddings, corporate events and customized events.

The community will also benefit from a new pricing model for football tickets and new, fan-friendly pricing on the most popular concessions. New tiered ticket pricing beginning with the 2017 season creates greater affordability for many fans with pricing ranging from $45 to $250. The prices on some of the most popular concessions — water, hot dogs and popcorn — will decrease by $1.50 to $3 each.  

Local families who are food insecure will benefit from a new collaborative program. Through the efforts of Notre Dame’s Office of Public Affairs, the Office of Sustainability, Cultivate Culinary School & Catering and Levy, fresh food that is leftover after football games in Notre Dame Stadium will be prepared into frozen meals. Cultivate Culinary will prepare and distribute the food to food-insecure families in the Michiana area.

Groups who are interested in volunteering at concession stands may contact Levy at 574-631-1761. Groups may inquire about guest service roles by calling Monterrey Security at 773-843-0434. Individuals may reach Cultivate Culinary School & Catering at 574-440-2214, and the team at VenueND can be reached at 574-631-1400.

Contact: Marissa Gebhard, 574-631-1553, gebhard.3@nd.edu

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Former Homeland Security official Francis Taylor joins Keough School of Global Affairs https://news.nd.edu/news/former-homeland-security-official-francis-taylor-joins-keough-school-of-global-affairs/ news_78837 2017-08-17T10:00:00-0400 Renée LaReau Francis X. Taylor has been named an executive fellow of the Global Policy Initiative in the new Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame.

Former Homeland Security official Francis Taylor joins Keough School of Global Affairs

Renée LaReau

Francis Taylor

Francis X. Taylor has been named an executive fellow of the Global Policy Initiative in the new Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame.

 

From 2014 to 2016, Taylor served as under secretary for intelligence and analysis in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), where he also served as DHS counterterrorism coordinator. Additionally, he was U.S. Department of State ambassador-at-large and coordinator for counterterrorism from July 2001 to November 2002.

 

Taylor is a Notre Dame graduate with bachelor’s (’70) and master’s (’74) degrees in government and international studies. He is a distinguished graduate of the Notre Dame Air Force ROTC program.

 

“General Taylor has served our country with distinction and understands government, business, the military, international relations and diplomacy from the inside,” said Scott Appleby, Marilyn Keough Dean of the Keough School.

 

“Not least, he is a loyal son of Notre Dame, who already has played a major role in connecting the Keough School to an impressive network of policymakers and government officials. We are honored and grateful that this distinguished American has agreed to join our leadership team.”

 

Taylor is a former vice president and chief security officer for General Electric Co. in Fairfield, Connecticut. Before joining GE, he had a distinguished, 35-year career in government service, holding several senior positions managing investigations, security and counterterrorism issues.

 

During 31 years of military service, Taylor served with distinction in numerous command and staff positions, rising to the rank of brigadier general in September 1996. In his final active duty assignment, he served as commander of the Air Force Office of Special Investigations at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland.

 

“I am thrilled to join the Keough School in developing the next generation of global leaders,” Taylor said. “It is an honor to return to Notre Dame to help our students prepare to serve as a force for good in our world.”

 

Taylor will serve as a lead instructor for a global policy seminar, teaching the inaugural cohort of 38 graduate students in the new Master of Global Affairs program. The course is offered as part of the Keough School’s Global Policy Initiative, which was founded to create new opportunities for engagement with policymaking institutions and programs in Washington, D.C., and around the world.

 

The Keough School of Global Affairs — founded in 2014 as Notre Dame’s first new degree-granting school or college in nearly 100 years — prepares new generations of students for skilled, effective and ethical global professional leadership.

 

Contact: Francis Taylor, ftaylor1@nd.edu

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Ryan Willerton appointed associate VP of Career and Professional Development https://news.nd.edu/news/ryan-willerton-appointed-associate-vp-of-career-and-professional-development/ news_78766 2017-08-16T08:00:00-0400 Kate Morgan Willerton, most recently the director of the Office of Community Standards at the University of Notre Dame, has been appointed associate vice president for career and professional development in the Division of Student Affairs, effective Aug. 22.  

Ryan Willerton appointed associate VP of Career and Professional Development

Kate Morgan

Ryan Willerton

Ryan Willerton, most recently the director of the Office of Community Standards at the University of Notre Dame, has been appointed associate vice president for career and professional development in the Division of Student Affairs, effective Aug. 22.  

“Ryan is a proven and innovative leader with a longstanding reputation for upholding the values and mission of Our Lady’s University,” said Erin Hoffmann Harding, vice president for student affairs. “He cares deeply about and works tirelessly on behalf of our students, his colleagues and the University. I am confident in Ryan’s abilities to lead our outstanding career and professional services team, deepen relationships with employers and ensure Notre Dame students are well equipped to find success, meaning and impact in their professional roles.”

Willerton earned his master’s degree in educational psychology and guidance from Eastern Illinois University and his bachelor’s degree in Spanish/secondary education from Bradley University. He began his career at Notre Dame in 1998 as a student development coordinator in the Student Activities Office, and went on to serve as the assistant director of residence life and housing from 2001 to 2003.

From 2003 to 2012, Willerton was the director of Student Activities Facilities where he led a department that managed the LaFortune Student Center, Washington Hall and Stepan Center. He also trained and developed hundreds of student managers and employees, facilitated thousands of student meetings and events and welcomed more than 2 million guests to the student center annually.
           

Since 2012, Willerton has overseen the University’s conduct process, reshaping the Office of Community Standards through careful study and engagement of students to ensure University policies and processes support student growth from their choices.   

Under Willerton’s direction, career services at Notre Dame will continue to allow students to reflect on their talents and values to seek impact in their careers while leveraging a robust network of alumni, benefactors and employers.

In his new role, Willerton will work collaboratively with undergraduate and graduate career services coaching and counseling teams and an employer relations team to create strategies for career discernment and development of Notre Dame students. He will also take an active role in outreach to existing and potential employers, recruiters and organizations to cultivate new relationships and expand career opportunities.

In addition, Willerton will oversee the operation of a world-class Career Center within the Duncan Student Center that will allow Notre Dame to reimagine the ways in which career services and resources are delivered not only to students, but to employer partners and alumni.

Willerton lives in South Bend with his wife, Mattie, and their two sons, Jack and Quinn. Mattie, a graduate of Notre Dame’s Remick Leadership Program, is entering her fifth year as principal of St. John the Evangelist Catholic School in Goshen.

Contact: Kate Morgan, communications program director for student affairs, 574-631-1377, kmorgan4@nd.edu

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Harper Cancer Research postdoc receives highly competitive career development award from NIH/NCI https://news.nd.edu/news/harper-cancer-research-postdoc-receives-highly-competitive-career-development-award-from-nihnci/ news_78792 2017-08-16T08:00:00-0400 Valli Sarveswaran Dr. Tyvette Hilliard, a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Sharon Stack, Director of Harper Cancer Research Institute, has received a highly competitive 5-year K01 Research Career Development award from the NIH/NCI.

Harper Cancer Research postdoc receives highly competitive career development award from NIH/NCI

Valli Sarveswaran

Tyvette Hilliard

Dr. Tyvette Hilliard, a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Sharon Stack, Director of Harper Cancer Research Institute, has received a highly competitive 5-year K01 Research Career Development award from the NIH/NCI. Her project titled, ‘The Impact of Maternal Obesity on the Reprogramming of the Metastatic Microenvironment’ will investigate how maternal obesity may influence the susceptibility of offspring to ovarian cancer metastasis. Tyvette is the first-ever K01 awardee from the University of Notre Dame.  The Harper Cancer Research Institute is happy to retain this highly promising young investigator as she begins her track record of independent federal funding here at Notre Dame.

Originally published by Valli Sarveswaran at graduateschool.nd.edu on August 01, 2017.

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Creating a virtual assistant for software engineers: It’s all about a common language https://news.nd.edu/news/creating-a-virtual-assistant-for-software-engineers-its-all-about-a-common-language/ news_78799 2017-08-16T08:00:00-0400 Nina Welding Most people are familiar with virtual assistants such as Siri or Alexa. They answer questions, make recommendations, and simplify common tasks. No such assistance exists for software engineers. This is what Collin McMillan, assistant professor of computer science and sngineering, and his team are exploring.

Creating a virtual assistant for software engineers: It’s all about a common language

Nina Welding

Most people are familiar with virtual assistants such as Siri or Alexa. They answer questions, make recommendations, and basically simplify common tasks. One simply asks for help and options are provided: everything from “calling home” to providing operating hours for the closest grocery store so a person’s time can be more productive. No such assistance exists for software engineers … at least not yet. This is what Collin McMillan, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, and his team are exploring.

Since joining the Notre Dame faculty in 2012, McMillan’s work has focused on source code summarization and being able to automatically generate English descriptions of source code behavior, which is exactly what he will need to do to create a virtual assistant for software engineers.

When assistants like Siri or Alexa exist, why do software engineers need one of their own? The answer is language. The virtual assistants for individuals work because they use a natural language interface — one based on common words, phrases, meanings and advanced machine learning technologies. Siri and Alexa have been programmed to understand and answer the basic questions an individual might ask in relation to everyday life.

But programmers often use different, more technical words and descriptions than others. When programmers need help, they ask a fellow programmer [someone who speaks their same “language”] or they stop what they are doing to find the answer themselves, documenting the process as they go along so they might use the process again or others might take advantage of it. Both take valuable time and reduce productivity. While documentation provides very specific information, it is only as valuable as the amount of information the individual programmer provides about the process.  

Because of the significant achievements in artificial intelligence and natural language processing (NLP) McMillan believes that it may now be possible to create a visual assistant for software engineering. However, a couple of issues would need to be addressed, first is the necessity for conversation analysis and modeling — identifying how programmers talk to one another, what types of questions they most frequently ask. Second is reference expression generation — how do they describe functions or software artifacts?

The three-year project that McMillan and his team have begun will create a model of the conversations between programmers. From there they will generate expressions that refer to software components in a human-like manner so that they can design algorithms to extract the data to make similar references as part of a knowledge base so the new virtual assistant could respond as quickly and accurately as a Siri or Alexa. Finally, they would test their techniques in the lab and in real-life settings to determine its effectiveness.

Not only will this provide scientific knowledge of how programmers ask and answer questions but it can provide new models for representing data in software projects, generate descriptions of software artifacts, and, hopefully, extend the impact of that information to better understand how persons with visual disabilities interact with software and its development — making all assistive technologies more accessible.

To follow this project throughout its three-year course, visit www.cse.nd.edu/~cmc/
 

Originally published by Nina Welding at conductorshare.nd.edu on August 10, 2017.

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