News » Archives » April 2015

Leo McWilliams

Author: Gene Stowe

The Minority Engineering Program: Helping students combine ethnic identity, Notre Dame identity

Leo McWilliams

Memphis native Leo McWilliams came to Notre Dame as an undergraduate in the late 1970s, earning a bachelor’s degree in economics in 1981, a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering in 1982, and a master’s degree in electrical engineering in 1985. That was before the Minority Engineering Program (MEP

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In memoriam: Lewis E. Nicholson, professor emeritus of English

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Lewis E. Nicholson

Lewis E. Nicholson, professor emeritus of English at the University of Notre Dame, died Tuesday (April 28) at his home in South Bend. He was 93.

A renowned scholar in medieval and Anglo-Saxon studies and a member of the Notre Dame faculty since 1958, Nicholson taught courses ranging from Beowulf, Chaucer and Middle English metrical romance to classes on the Gothic language and Old Norse. For the last 18 years of his life, he directed the Hesburgh Library’s Medieval Library Initiative.

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Iris Outlaw receives AABHE Exemplary Award for Public Service

Author: Notre Dame News

Iris Outlaw

The American Association of Blacks in Higher Education (AABHE) presented the AABHE Exemplary Award for Public Service to Iris Outlaw, director of Multicultural Student Programs and Services at the University of Notre Dame, at the 2015 AABHE National Conference in Charleston, South Carolina, on April 10. The AABHE Exemplary Public Service Award goes to those individuals whose public lives and careers have been superlative with regard to addressing broad policy issues relating to the welfare of black Americans.

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Notre Dame researchers shed light on massive, but little-known, quarterly information release in the banking industry

Author: William G. Gilroy

Trading

A flood of financial information about the banking industry will be released with no fanfare near Thursday (April 30), as is the case around the 30th of the last month of each quarter. Some investors are aware of this routine quarterly event and trade on it, but the event is not widely known and occurs outside of the purview of the SEC, the agency tasked with ensuring that investors have equal access to company information. In some cases, the event makes old news of reports that are later released through SEC-governed channels.

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New study examines relationship between electricity usage and stock market return

Author: William G. Gilroy

Electric lines

A new study by Zhi Da, Viola D. Hank Associate Professor of Finance at the University of Notre Dame, shows that the growth rate in industrial electricity usage negatively predicts next one-year stock market returns.

“For example, if the industrial electricity usage this month is one percent lower than that in the same month last year, we predict the stock market return to be 0.92 percent higher in the next year,” Da said.

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Notre Dame to host 2016 exhibition of William Shakespeare’s 1623 First Folio

Author: Notre Dame News

Shakespeare's First Folio

The University of Notre Dame will host an exhibition of William Shakespeare’s First Folio next January.

One of the world’s rarest and most treasured books, the First Folio is the first collected edition of Shakespeare’s plays. It will be displayed in the Hesburgh Library at Notre Dame Jan. 4-29 during a nationwide traveling exhibition titled “First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare,” sponsored by the Folger Shakespeare Library in partnership with the Cincinnati Museum Center and the American Library Association and hosted by Shakespeare at Notre Dame.

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Noted scholar of Quran and early Islamic history to deliver the Graduate School Commencement address

Author: William G. Gilroy

Jane Dammen McAuliffe

Jane McAuliffe, a scholar of the Quran and early Islamic history, and director of the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress, will deliver the Commencement address on May 16 (Saturday) at the Commencement ceremony for the University of Notre Dame Graduate School.

The Graduate School ceremony will take place at 10 a.m. at the Compton Family Ice Arena and will honor the University’s new doctoral and master’s degree recipients.

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Archbishop Fitzgerald to speak on Christianity and Islam 50 years after 'Nostra Aetate'

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Archbishop Michael Fitzgerald

Archbishop Michael Fitzgerald will give a public lecture commemorating the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Second Vatican Council document “Nostra Aetate” at 5 p.m. Thursday (April 23) in Geddes Hall’s Andrews Auditorium at the University of Notre Dame.

Archbishop Fitzgerald’s lecture, “The Church and Islam 50 Years after Nostra Aetate,” will focus on the influence “Nostra Aetate,” the Council’s pivotal declaration on non-Christian religions, has had on relations between Christians and Muslims.

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New paper sheds light on harnessing the clinical potential of microvesicles released from cancer cells

Author: William G. Gilroy

Tumor cell surrounded by shed microvesicles

Over the past few years, extracellular vesicles, or membrane sacs secreted from cells, have emerged as important mediators by which cells communicate with their surroundings to regulate a diverse range of biological processes. In addition, specialized roles for extracellular vesicles are beginning to be recognized in various diseases including cancer, infectious diseases and neurodegenerative disorders. Moreover, engineered extracellular vesicles are likely to have applications in drug delivery.

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Sidney Tarrow to deliver 21st Hesburgh Lecture in Ethics and Public Policy

Author: Renée LaReau

Sidney Tarrow

Sidney Tarrow, Emeritus Maxwell M. Upson Professor of Government at Cornell University, will deliver the 21st annual Hesburgh Lecture in Ethics and Public Policy at 4 p.m. April 30 (Thursday) in the Hesburgh Center for International Studies Auditorium at the University of Notre Dame. The Hesburgh Lecture, sponsored by the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, is free and open to the public.

Tarrow’s lecture, “Seeking Peace in Wartime; Opposing War in Peacetime,” will explore the effects of recent wars — the Ukrainian war, the violent outcome of the Arab Spring, the Islamic State takeover of parts of Iraq and Syria — on the U.S. peace movement.

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Detecting low-quality antimalarial drugs with a lab-on-paper

Author: William G. Gilroy

This paper test card is inexpensive way to distinguish substitutes or diluted drugs from real medicines used to treat common bacterial infections and tuberculosis

Access to high-quality medicine is a basic human right, but more than four billion people live in countries where many medications are substandard or fake. Marya Lieberman of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame and Abigail Weaver, a postdoctoral associate in the University’s Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental and Earth Sciences, took up the challenge of how people in developing countries could detect low-quality antimalarial drugs without expensive equipment and without handling dangerous chemicals.

The solution they developed involves using paper cards, embedded with reagents, that carry out 12 colorful chemical tests all at once on a solid sample. The colors show whether a medicine contains the expected ingredients and whether fillers or substitute drugs have been added.

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Notre Dame Day 2015, a global celebration of the University, will launch April 26

Author: Andrea Bullock

Notre Dame Day

The University of Notre Dame family will come together on campus and around the globe on April 26-27 (Sunday-Monday) to celebrate Our Lady’s University during the second annual Notre Dame Day.

The celebration will launch at 18:42 (6:42 p.m. EDT), referencing the University’s founding year, on April 26 and end at midnight on April 27. The 29-hour live broadcast from LaFortune Student Center will share compelling Notre Dame stories from around the world, live interviews, celebrity guests, musical performances and much more. It also provides the Notre Dame family the opportunity to give back to specific areas of the University they love most through an online fundraising competition.

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Statement from Notre Dame President Father Jenkins on the passing of Cardinal George

Author: Dennis Brown

nd_blue_seal_300

The following is a statement from Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., president of the University of Notre Dame, on the passing of Cardinal Francis George, Archbishop Emeritus of Chicago, on Friday (April 17):

“Cardinal Francis George was a good and faithful bishop, a leader in the American Church and a dedicated witness to the Gospel. My thoughts and prayers are with his family, his religious community and the Archdiocese of Chicago. May he rest in the peace of Christ.”

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New paper opens the door to the study of a new class of materials

Author: William G. Gilroy

A highly filled pack of Platonic solids with 100 total particles

A new paper by a team of researchers led by Karel Matous, College of Engineering Associate Professor of Computational Mechanics in the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, describes how an accurate statistical description of heterogeneous particulate materials, which is used within statistical micromechanics theories, governs the overall thermo-mechanical properties. This detailed statistical description was computed using a novel adaptive interpolation/integration scheme on the nation’s largest parallel supercomputers. Quantifying the morphology of many-body systems has applications in many scientific fields at a variety of length scales from molecular configurations up to structural composites and celestial bodies.

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Rabbi David Dalin to speak on Saint Pope John and the Jews

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Rabbi David Dalin

Rabbi David Dalin, professor of law and politics at Ave Maria University, will speak at 7 p.m. Monday (April 20) in the Eck Visitors Center auditorium on “Pope John XXIII and the Jews.”

Rabbi Dalin, a historian and author of numerous books including “Religion and State in the American Jewish Experience,” will examine the history of St. Pope John’s relationship with the Jewish people from the saint’s role as a Vatican diplomat saving lives in Nazi-occupied Europe to his convening of the Second Vatican Council and encouragement of the promulgation of “Nostra Aetate,” the Council’s declaration on non-Christian religions that profoundly transformed Christian-Jewish relations.

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Students launch 'It’s On Us' video

Author: Notre Dame News

"It's on Us Notre Dame" campaign

A new video, produced by University of Notre Dame students, aims to shift the way people think about sexual assault. Created similarly to a recent White House initiative, the video is part of the “It’s On Us Notre Dame” awareness campaign launched by the Gender Issues Committee within Student Government. The campaign’s goal is to empower individuals to be active participants in stopping sexual assault.

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Climate change is affecting disease-carrying mosquitoes and other insects

Author: Sarah Craig

mosquito

Insect-borne diseases — such as malaria, dengue, West Nile and the newly emerging chikungunya — infect a billion people every year; more than a million die each year and many more are disabled. The effects of climate change, according to Edwin Michael, professor of biological sciences and member of the Eck Institute for Global Health at the University of Notre Dame, mean these deadly diseases are no longer reserved for the developing world.

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Researchers identify molecular mechanism responsible for making malaria parasites drug-resistant

Author: Stephanie Healey

Red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite P. falciparum at the "ring" stage, either sensitive or resistant to artemisinins

University of Notre Dame researchers led an international team to identify a molecular mechanism responsible for making malaria parasites resistant to artemisinins, the leading class of antimalarial drugs.

According to the World Health Organization’s 2014 World Malaria Report, there are an estimated 198 million cases of malaria worldwide with 3.3 billion people at risk for contracting the infection. Although the impact of malaria is still significant, the statistics reflect a considerable reduction in the global malaria burden. Since 2010, disease transmission has been reduced by 30 percent and mortality due to malaria has decreased by almost half.

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