News » Archives » June 2014

In memoriam: Rev. Alfred F. D’Alonzo, C.S.C.

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Rev. Alfred F. D’Alonzo, C.S.C.

Rev. Alfred F. D’Alonzo, C.S.C., died Friday (June 27) at Holy Cross House. He was 88.

A native of Orange, N.J., Father D’Alonzo was an all-state New Jersey football player when he came to Notre Dame in 1944. In addition to playing on the University’s storied football team, he attended the Naval Officers’ Training School here before entering the Congregation of Holy Cross in 1946. He was graduated from Notre Dame in 1949 and ordained a Holy Cross priest in 1953.

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Notre Dame and UNC-Chapel Hill philosophers to examine religious and transformative experiences

Author: Carrie Gates

The Experience Project

Whether as dramatic as the divine visions that inspired Mother Teresa’s work or as commonplace as the decision to have a child, certain events have the power to transform us.

To explore aspects of these religious and transformative experiences, philosophers Michael Rea and Samuel Newlands of the University of Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters and philosopher L.A. Paul from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s College of Arts and Sciences will co-direct “The Experience Project.”

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Notre Dame collaborating with five partners to build nation’s top turbine engine component research and testing facility

Author: Dennis Brown

Notre Dame Turbomachinery Facility

The University of Notre Dame and five public and private partners announced today Thursday (June 26) a $36 million project that will be the nation’s foremost research and test facility for advancing the technology used in the massive gas turbine engines used by commercial and military aircraft, power plants, and the oil and gas industry.

Construction in South Bend’s Ignition Park on a 43,000-square-foot building — of which 25,000 square feet will be for the Notre Dame Turbomachinery Facility — will begin this summer and be completed by March. The facility will be fully operational in July 2016.

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Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture hosts fourth annual Vita Institute

Author: Notre Dame News

O. Carter Snead O. Carter Snead

The University of Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture hosted the fourth annual Vita Institute at the Notre Dame June 7-14. The week-long event brought together current and emerging leaders in the national and international pro-life movement with world-renowned scholars for a unique opportunity to study the fundamentals of the life issues at the highest academic level and across a wide range of disciplines.

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Notre Dame Haiti Program completes yearly mass drug administration

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Children at JUVENAT School in Haiti receive their annual medication from the Notre Dame Haiti Program to prevent lymphatic filariasis Children at JUVENAT School in Haiti receive their annual medication from the Notre Dame Haiti Program to prevent lymphatic filariasis

The University of Notre Dame Haiti Program will complete the final mass drug administration (MDA) for this year in Arcahaie, Haiti, from Thursday-Sunday (June 19-22). The program, which aims to eliminate lymphatic filariasis, a mosquito-borne endemic disease, from Haiti by the year 2020, has successfully completed MDA this year in Léogâne, Port-au-Prince and 19 other communes in the Caribbean country.

Recently, the program completed MDA in the Carrefour commune, located at western end of the Port-au-Prince metropolitan area. More than 1,000 students at JUVENAT School, a private school in the region, were among those who received a combination of two drugs designed to treat the parasitic worm that causes lymphatic filariasis.

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The ministry of storytelling

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Rev. Joseph V. Corpora, C.S.C.

The Catholic Church is the largest of the Christian churches in the nation, and more than half of the Catholics in the United States who are under the age of 25 are Latinos. Barring massive changes in birthrates and immigration, a majority of American Catholics will be Latinos by the year 2050. If the rise of Latino Catholics confronts the Catholic Church in America with a profound and tumultuous challenge, the University of Notre Dame’s Rev. Joseph V. Corpora, C.S.C., sees it as a blessing as well. “I think Latino Catholics might even be God’s last-ditch effort to keep the American Catholic Church truly catholic, sacramental and diverse,” he said.

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'Trophy wife' stereotype is largely a myth, new study shows

Author: Shannon Chapla

Melania Knauss-Trump

Most people are familiar with the “trophy wife” stereotype that attractive women marry rich men, placing little importance on their other traits, including physical appearance, and that men look for pretty wives but don’t care about their education or earnings.

New research, however, by University of Notre Dame sociologist Elizabeth McClintock shows the trophy wife stereotype is largely a myth fueled by selective observation that reinforces sexist stereotypes and trivializes women’s careers.

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ND Expert: Diplomacy, not more arms, needed in Iraq

Author: Shannon Chapla

David Cortright

The recent capture of Mosul, Iraq, by militant Sunni extremist groups is a “body blow” to the country’s Shia-dominated government and marks a significant escalation of the region’s sectarian war, according to David Cortright, director of policy studies at the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.

Hundreds of thousands of civilians have fled their homes to escape the violence in Iraq’s second largest city, while the incursion highlights the government’s inability to maintain security.

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Professor Theodore J. Cachey Jr. named director of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway

Author: Notre Dame News

Rome Global Gateway

Professor Theodore J. Cachey Jr., the Albert J. and Helen M. Ravarino Family Director of Dante and Italian Studies at the University of Notre Dame, has been named the inaugural academic director of the University’s Rome Global Gateway. The appointment, effective July 1, was announced by J. Nicholas Entrikin, vice president and associate provost for internationalization.

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NPC researchers gather at Notre Dame to discuss progress at annual conference

Author: Stephanie Healey

Olaf Wiest

More than 70 researchers, patients and families will attend the 2014 Michael, Marcia and Christa Parseghian Conference for Niemann-Pick Type C Research on Thursday-Saturday (June 12-14) at the Jordan Hall of Science at University of Notre Dame. The conference is hosted annually by the College of Science and the Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation (APMRF).

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Notre Dame partners with edX to offer open online courses

Author: Shannon Chapla

edX Consortium

The University of Notre Dame on Wednesday (June 11) announced that it has joined the edX Consortium as a charter member. A not-for-profit partnership of leading global universities, edX is committed to innovations in online and blended learning, improving access to education, and researching effective learning for use on and beyond college campuses.

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Alliance for Catholic Education's National Bus Tour comes home

Author: Notre Dame News

ACE Bus

After traveling 30,000 miles to visit more than 16,000 Catholic school students throughout the past year, the Alliance for Catholic Education’s celebration of the gift of Catholic schools is just beginning.

The Fighting for Our Children’s Future National Bus Tour visited 65 K-12 Catholic schools across 35 states to celebrate the vital role these and thousands of other Catholic schools play in serving poor and marginalized students and their communities. According to ACE’s founders, those 30,000 miles are just the first step in changing the narrative on Catholic schools.

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Peter Kogge receives 2014 Babbage Award

Author: Nina Welding

Peter M. Kogge

University of Notre Dame computer science and engineering professor Peter M. Kogge, developer of the space shuttle I/O processor, the world’s first multicore processor, and a number of other important innovations, was awarded the Charles Babbage Award at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ (IEEE) 2014 International Parallel & Distributed Processing Symposium in Phoenix earlier this year.

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ND Expert: Remembering D-Day

Author: Shannon Chapla

Michael Desch

Watch video Video

As the world marks the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion that led to the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II, Michael Desch, professor and chair of political science at the University of Notre Dame, reflects on this day in history and draws a connection to the current Ukraine crisis.

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ND Expert: China still corrupt, dealing with fallout on 25th anniversary of Tiananmen

Author: Shannon Chapla

Lionel Jensen

Wednesday (June 4) marked the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown, during which soldiers in Beijing killed hundreds of students, workers and professionals peacefully seeking greater democracy and limits on corruption. Lionel Jensen, associate professor of East Asian languages and cultures at the University of Notre Dame, says the country continues to struggle with the very same problems that provoked those protests, even as its government works feverishly to erase all memory of those fateful events.

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Notre Dame receives Grand Challenges Explorations grant for research in global health and development

Author: Marissa Gebhard

The PAD project

Marya Lieberman, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame, has received a Grand Challenges Explorations grant, an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Lieberman will pursue an innovative global health and development research project, titled “Printed test cards for rapid field screening of human and animal medications.”

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ND Expert: New carbon emission rule targets existing plants, will result in lawsuits

Author: Shannon Chapla

Bruce Huber

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday (June 2) released its Clean Power Plan, a long-awaited proposal that seeks to cut carbon emissions from existing power plants by 30 percent by 2030.

“These power plants account for about one-third of all such emissions within the U.S., and more importantly, they have historically escaped the brunt of regulation by the EPA, which generally focuses instead on newly constructed plants,” according to Bruce Huber, associate professor of law at the University of Notre Dame.

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