News » Archives » March 2011

Trouble with algebra? Research shows basic math may be to blame

Author:

Nicole McNeil

New research from the University of Notre Dame suggests that even though adults tend to think in more advanced ways than children do, those advanced ways of thinking don’t always override old, incorrect ways of thinking – especially in the domain of mathematics. The study was published in a recent issue of the Journal of Cognition and Development.

Conducted by Notre Dame psychologist Nicole McNeil and colleagues, the study examined how practice with basic addition facts affects performance on more advanced math problems.

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Event to explore opportunities in public and nonprofit sectors

Author: Carol Elliott

Making a Living Making a Difference

The idea of a “lifestyle career” – one that combines business skills with passions for social causes – is gaining attention, as people search for ways to add more meaning to their work lives. But the path for finding such a career isn’t always as obvious as for more traditional choices.

Exploring employment opportunities in nonprofit and public sectors is the focus on the ninth annual “Making a Living Making a Difference” program, to be held April 5 (Tuesday), from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in Geddes Hall at the University of Notre Dame.

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Community welcomed to campus for 3rd annual CommUniversity Day

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Notre Dame CommUniversity Day 2011

University of Notre Dame student organizers of CommUniversity Day are putting a new emphasis on this annual day of service, calling on community members to enjoy a visit to campus. The third annual CommUniversity Day takes place April 2 (Saturday).

Community members can participate in on-campus activities, including campus tours and a kids’ festival.

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Engineering faculty receive inaugural 1st Source Commercialization Award

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1st Source logo

University of Notre Dame engineers Peter Kogge and Jay Brockman have been named recipients of the inaugural 1st Source Commercialization Award celebrating research that has made it to the marketplace.

Kogge, Ted H. McCourtney Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, and Brockman, associate engineering dean and concurrent associate professor of computer science and electrical engineering, were honored for their role in developing the Enhanced Memory Utilization (Emu) hardware and software technology behind Emu Solutions.

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Father Hesburgh awarded Catholic Charities USA Centennial Medal

Author: Carol Elliott

Father Hesburgh receives Centennial Medal

Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., president emeritus of the University of Notre Dame, received a specially commissioned Centennial Medal on Sunday (March 27) from Catholic Charities USA (CCUSA), the 100-year-old social services organization working to reduce poverty in America.

“We honor a man not only deeply admired and respected in this country, but around the world," said Rev. Larry Snyder, president and CEO of CCUSA. "Father Hesburgh’s life has been one of devotion to education and service to his church – exemplified by his unparalleled 35 years as president of Notre Dame.

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FTT to present Shakespeare's "The Two Gentlemen of Verona"

Author: Chris Sopczynski

"The Two Gentlemen of Verona"

The University of Notre Dame Department of Film, Television and Theatre (FTT), in partnership with the Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival, will present William Shakespeare’s “The Two Gentlemen of Verona” April 5 to 10 (Tuesday to Sunday) in the Decio Mainstage Theatre of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.

Directed by Donald Carrier (Stratford Shakespeare Festival, The Old Globe Theatre, Chicago Shakespeare Theatre), the play is the first collaboration between FTT and the Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival.

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Japanese nuclear crisis highlights importance of Notre Dame energy research

Author: William G. Gilroy

Japan Nuclear Crisis

The continuing nuclear energy crisis at Japan’s earthquake and tsunami damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear site has once again raised questions in the United States about how to manage and safely store highly radioactive spent nuclear fuel. The questions have long been the focus of researchers Thomas Albrecht-Schmitt and Peter Burns of the University of Notre Dame’s Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences.

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Large Binocular Telescope director to speak on latest astronomy research

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Large Binocular Telescope

As part of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) annual board of directors meeting, Richard Green, director of the LBT, will give a public lecture, “The Large Binocular Telescope: a New Era in Astronomy and Engineering” at 7 p.m. on March 29 (Tuesday) in the Carey Auditorium of the Hesburgh Library at the University of Notre Dame.

With its capability, the LBT is the largest single telescope in the world. Located in southeastern Arizona, the $120 million LBT is the first of a new generation of extraordinarily large optical telescopes

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Notre Dame suspends remainder of its Japanese program

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Japan

The University of Notre Dame has suspended its international undergraduate program in Nagoya, Japan.

In a letter to the two Notre Dame students participating in the Japanese study abroad program, the University’s Office of International Studies described the decision as “very difficult,” but that suspension was the most prudent course of action “due to the deteriorating environmental conditions in the areas around Tokyo and ongoing uncertainty about the stability of the nuclear power plant.”

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Asian Film Festival to focus on Japanese anime

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Asian Film Festival

Ninjas, mysterious dream worlds, and evil social-networking sites are among the themes that will play out on the big screen this weekend during the University of Notre Dame’s seventh annual Asian Film Festival and Conference.

Presented by the Kellogg Institute for International Studies and the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center March 25 and 26 (Friday and Saturday), the festival will showcase five recent animated films from Japan, including two from internationally acclaimed director Satoshi Kon.

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Biologist Hellmann named Leopold Leadership Fellow

Author: William G. Gilroy

Jessica Hellmann

Jessica Hellmann, associate professor of biological sciences and a national authority on climate change adaptation at the University of Notre Dame, has been named a Leopold Leadership Fellow. The Leopold Leadership Program is the nation’s premier competitive fellowship for outstanding environmental scientists who are also actively engaged in outreach to decision makers and the public about their work.

Hellmann has extensive expertise on the impacts of climate change and novel solutions about how society and ecosystems might adapt to those changes.

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Notre Dame to go beyond Earth Hour

Author: Rachel Novick

Earth Hour

Watch Video Video

This year, the University of Notre Dame will expand its participation in Earth Hour by turning out the lights on the Golden Dome of the Main Building and the “Word of Life” mural on the Hesburgh Library for an entire weekend. Earth Hour, which takes place on March 26 (Saturday) at 8:30 p.m., has become an international symbol of support for climate change action involving hundreds of millions of people in over 120 countries.

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ND Expert: Ford CEO’s “epically large” pay package raises questions of moral responsibility

Author: Shannon Chapla

mikemannor_hires

Ford Motor Co. CEO Alan Mulally, who revived the No. 2 automaker after more than $30 billion in losses from 2006 through 2008, received a stock award worth some $55 million and recently earned harsh criticism from UAW President Bob King, who called the pay package “morally wrong.”

Mike Mannor, assistant professor of management at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business, says CEO pay is a very complex issue that involves a lot of tradeoffs, and that in this case, Mulally represents a particularly interesting situation.

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In memoriam: John E. Renaud, chair of aerospace and mechanical engineering

Author: Michael O. Garvey

In Memoriam

John E. Renaud, professor and chair of aerospace and mechanical engineering at the University of Notre Dame, died Friday (March 18) at his home in Niles, Mich., of cancer. He was 50 years old.

A native of Rochester, N.Y., Renaud was graduated from the University of Maine at Orono in 1982. He worked for five years as a manufacturing systems design engineer at the Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester before earning master’s and doctoral degrees in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1989 and 1992, respectively. He joined the aerospace and mechanical engineering faculty at Notre Dame in 1992 and has chaired the department since 2008.

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Breakthrough in Niemann-Pick Type C research reported by Notre Dame and Cornell scientists

Author: William G. Gilroy and Gene Stowe

PNAS Logo

A paper announcing a breakthrough discovery in the fight against Niemann-Pick Type C, coauthored by Olaf Wiest and Paul Helquist of the University of Notre Dame’s Department Chemistry and Biochemistry and Frederick Maxfield, Chair of Biochemistry at Cornell University Weill College of Medicine, appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science this week. The paper shows how use of a histone deacetylase inhibitor corrects the damage done by the genetic disorder and allowed once-diseased cells to function normally.

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Notre Dame Cycling Team to host conference race to benefit rare disease research

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Notre Dame Cycling Team

The University of Notre Dame Cycling Team will raise money for the Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation when it hosts the Midwest Collegiate Cycling Conference race in downtown South Bend on March 26 and 27 (Saturday and Sunday). Up to 200 cyclists from other schools in the conference, including the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, Ohio State University and Purdue University, are expected to compete.

The Notre Dame Cycling Team is using the event to fund research to fight Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease, a genetic neurodegenerative disorder that is usually fatal. Three grandchildren of legendary Notre Dame football coach Ara Parseghian died from the disease, and their parents, Mike and Cindy Parseghian, started the foundation in 1994 to fund research to find treatments and a cure.

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International experts to address social concerns

Author: Paul Horn

Dear Brothers and Sisters Conference

The Center for Social Concerns of the University of Notre Dame will host leading international scholars in the Catholic Social Tradition on campus for a Dear Brothers and Sisters Conference March 24 to 26 (Thursday to Saturday), to consider how 120 years of Catholic social teaching apply to the social issues of our world today. Issues to be discussed at the conference include globalization, immigration, racial justice, the environment and worker rights.

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Notre Dame cancels Japan undergraduate program

Author: Michael O. Garvey

Tokyo, Japan

A spring semester program for University of Notre Dame students in Tokyo, Japan has been canceled by Notre Dame’s Office of International Studies due to the situation following that country’s March 11 earthquake and tsunami and its subsequent nuclear crisis.

The three students enrolled in the canceled program had been scheduled to leave for Japan March 27.

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Statement from Notre Dame’s Father John Jenkins on the disaster in Japan

Author: Notre Dame News

Blue Seal

The massive earthquake and tsunami that ravaged Japan last week, and the ongoing destruction that has ensued in recent days, is a tragedy of nearly incomprehensible proportions. My prayers are with those from our University who have been directly affected, as well as with the Japanese people as a whole.

At the time of the quake, two Notre Dame students were participating in our study abroad program in Nagoya. We are thankful that they are safe, and we are closely monitoring events to ensure their continued safety, as well as that of a third student who traveled to Japan for spring break.

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Notre Dame’s Higgins Program report responds to right-to-work legislation

Author: Notre Dame News

Higgins Labor Studies Program

The University of Notre Dame’s Higgins Labor Studies Program recently released a report in response to the Indiana Chamber of Commerce’s position on right-to-work (RTW) legislation considered by the Indiana legislature. If passed, the legislation would prevent unions and employers from negotiating a requirement that employees pay their “fair share” for union costs such as collective bargaining and grievance representation.

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Malcolm Fraser elected fellow of American Academy of Microbiology

Author: Marissa Gebhard

Malcolm Fraser

Malcolm J. Fraser Jr., professor of biological sciences at the University of Notre Dame, has been elected a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, an honorary leadership group within the American Society for Microbiology. The election recognizes Fraser’s long record of teaching and innovative research, especially in the fields of virology and transgenic engineering.

Fraser discovered the piggyBac transposon, characterized its function and developed it as a “universal” transgenesis system. The system has been applied in many medically and economically important species that previously lacked efficient transformation systems, including the malaria-causing protozoan parasite, disease-carrying mosquitoes, silk moths, and grain beetles.

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Historian Felipe Fernández-Armesto honored in Spain

Author: Kate Cohorst

Felipe Fernández-Armesto honored in Spain

Felipe Fernández-Armesto, William P. Reynolds Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame, has been appointed the 2011 Cátedra Hispano-Británica Reina Victoria Eugenia at the Complutense University of Madrid.

Named for Queen Victoria Eugenia, the consort of Spanish King Alfonso XIII, the honor is awarded each year to a distinguished British professor in a different discipline. This year, the academic chair is in communications studies.

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ND Sustainability Research: Corporate walk needs to catch up to talk

Author: Carol Elliott

sarv_devaraj

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When it comes to sustainability, are companies walking the walk, or just talking?

The answer appears to be more talk, less walk, according to recent research by Sarv Devaraj, Notre Dame management professor, and Suvrat Dhanorkar, a 2010 graduate of the Notre Dame MBA program.

Their paper, “Do as I Say, Not as I Do—An Empirical Examination of the Relationship between Corporate Sustainability Beliefs and Performance,” related 24 key sustainability phrases in the 10K statements of Fortune 200 companies with actual performance measures.

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First year brings success for Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study

Author: Renee Hochstetler

ndias

What must we change in order to help us bridge the gap between the world as it is, and the world as it should be?

In its first year, the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS), inspired by the classical values of beauty, goodness and truth, began transforming the academic landscape through an annual conference, lecture series and fellowships supporting research that extends beyond the analysis of particular problems to the examination of larger—often ethical —ultimate questions.

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Notre Dame anthropologist receives grant to explore human nature

Author: Kate Cohorst

Agustin Fuentes

Who are we? Why are we here? Why do we do what we do? What makes humans unique?

These are the universal questions at the heart of an ambitious new initiative led by University of Notre Dame anthropologist Agustín Fuentes.

Funded by a $197,000 grant from the John Templeton Foundation, the Human Natures Project is a two-year research effort that could pave the way for a much larger, long-term endeavor.

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Conference to explore U.N. Millennium Development Goals

Author: Carol Elliott

United Nations

In 2000, the United Nations estimated that more than a billion people worldwide lived in extreme poverty, a condition that organization described as “abject and dehumanizing” – translating into starvation, disease and death.

In that same year, 189 world leaders came together at U.N. Headquarters in New York to commit their nations to a new global partnership dedicated to alleviating dire poverty. They created “eight goals for humanity” to be accomplished by 2015, which came to be known as the Millennium Development Goals, a concerted effort to help the least advantaged among the world’s population.

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Research shows "The Troubles” of Northern Ireland linked to mental health problems in children

Author:

Mark Cummings

Though exposure to any type of violence can cause anti-social behavior in children, a new study from the University of Notre Dame shows that political tension and sectarian violence causes additional mental health problems in children by creating insecurity about their neighborhoods and communities. The study was published recently in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.

Notre Dame Psychology Professor Mark Cummings and colleagues studied the effects on children of sectarian violence between Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland.

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