Zachary Schafer

Zachary Schafer

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Coleman Foundation Associate Professor of Cancer Biology

Office: 222 Galvin Life Science Center
Lab: 225 & 226 Galvin Life Science Center
Office Phone: 574-631-0875
Lab Phone: 574-631-3228
Email: zschafe1@nd.edu

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Areas of Expertise

Cancer metastasis, cell death, breast cancer, antioxidants

Schafer studies cancer cells and metastasis. The goal of Schafer’s laboratory is to examine and characterize the biological mechanisms that permit cancer cell survival in the absence of ECM attachment, with the long-term goal to reduce cancer metastasis and mortality through the design of novel drugs that induce cell death in metastatic cancer cells. He has co-authored several papers and is the recipient of a Research Scholar Grant from the American Cancer Society (ACS) to study metabolic defects in breast cancer. He was also named a 2011 V Scholar by one of the nation’s leading cancer research fundraising organizations, the V Foundation for Cancer Research. Schafer earned his bachelor of science degree from the University of Notre Dame and a Ph.D. from Duke University.

ND NEWSWIRE ARTICLES

Breast cancer researcher studies antioxidant connection
Two recent papers shed light on how breast cancer cells avoid cell death
Cancer biologist Zachary Schafer awarded American Cancer Society grant
New paper provides important insights into how carcinoma-associated fibroblasts function in breast cancers
New paper offers insights into how cancer cells avoid cell death
Notre Dame cancer researcher named V Scholar
New paper offers intriguing insights into tumor metabolism

IN THE NEWS

Stat — Do antioxidants promote health — or fuel cancer?
Scientific American — Antioxidants May Make Cancer Worse
WSBT — Notre Dame research says antioxidants could be hurting cancer patients
WNDU — Notre Dame conducts breast cancer research
The Washington Post — New study raises questions about antioxidant use in lung cancer patients
National Geographic — Antioxidants Encourage Cancer in Some Cases, Study Says