Peter Burns


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Henry J. Massman Chair and Professor of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences;
Director, Center for Sustainable Energy at Notre Dame

Office: 301 Stinson-Remick Hall of Engineering
Phone: 574-631-7852

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Areas of Expertise

Environmental mineralogy and crystallography, mineral crystal structures and crystal chemistry, mineral structural energetics, mineral paragenesis, nuclear waste disposal

Burns’ research focuses on the solid state and environmental chemistry of heavy metals, especially actinides including uranium, neptunium and plutonium. He is the director of the Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides. This EFRC, which is funded by the Department of Energy, includes senior researchers and students at six universities and three national laboratories. Burns also serves as director of the Center for Sustainable Energy at Notre Dame and concurrent professor of chemistry and biochemistry. Burns , who has received numerous awards throughout his career, has been named one of the top 10 most cited authors in the field of geosciences for the period 1997 to 2006.


Notre Dame Energy Frontier Research Center receives further DOE funding
New paper examines issues raised by Fukushima reactor accident
New paper examines seawater’s effect on nuclear fuel
Notre Dame receives funding for Energy Frontier Research Center
DOE to establish Energy Frontier Research Center at Notre Dame
Japanese nuclear crisis highlights importance of Notre Dame energy research
Burns among top 10 most cited geosciences authors
New class of materials discovered by Notre Dame and Argonne researchers
Regional partnership supports discovery of new materials
Study offers new insights into the storage of nuclear waste

IN THE NEWS — Mix seawater, nuclear fuel: Result is still an unknown — Nuclear safety lessons explored post-Fukushima
Discovery News — Mixing Seawater and Nuke Fuel: Still Murky
The Salt Lake Tribune — Depleted uranium: Both sides sound off
ABC 57 — New study finds tsunami aftermath might not have been handled properly