Geoffrey C. Layman

Geoff Layman

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Professor of American Politics

Office: 445 Decio Hall
Phone: 574-631-0379
Email: glayman@nd.edu

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Areas of Expertise

American politics, political parties, public opinion, voting behavior, religion and politics, research methods

Layman specializes in political parties, political behavior, and religion and politics, focusing especially on long-term changes in the parties and their electoral coalitions. His first book, “The Great Divide: Religious and Cultural Conflict in American Party Politics” (Columbia, 2001), examines the growing division of the Democratic and Republican parties along religious and cultural lines. Layman currently is involved in two book-length projects: one with Thomas Carsey on “conflict extension” and polarization in American party politics, and another with David Campbell and John Green on the political causes and consequences of growing secularism in the U.S. He also is involved in a variety of other projects on public opinion, electoral behavior, and religion and politics. Layman has published numerous articles in the discipline’s leading journals, including the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, the British Journal of Political Science and the Annual Review of Political Science.

ND EXPERTS

Brokered convention ‘unlikely’ and ‘unhappy’ for GOP

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